The CFE, Management & Cybersecurity

Strategic decisions affect the ultimate success or failure of any organization. Thus, they are usually evaluated and made by the top executives. Risk management contributes meaningfully and consistently to the organization’s success as defined at the highest levels. To achieve this objective, top executives first must believe there is substantial value to be gained by embracing risk management. The best way for CFEs and other risk management professionals to engage these executives is to align fraud risk management with achievement (or non-achievement) of the organization’s vital performance targets, and use it to drive better decisions and outcomes with a higher degree of certainty.

Next, top management must trust its internal risk management professional as a peer who provides valuable perspective. Every risk assurance professional must earn trust and respect by consistently exhibiting insightful risk and performance management competence, and by evincing a deep understanding of the business and its strategic vision, objectives, and initiatives. He or she must simplify fraud risk discussions by focusing on uncertainty relative to strategic objectives and by categorizing these risks in a meaningful way. Moreover, the risk professional must always be willing to take a contrarian position, relying on objective evidence where readily available, rather than simply deferring to the subjective. Because CFEs share many of these same traits, the CFE can help internal risk executives gain that trust and respect within their client organizations.

In the past, many organizations integrated fraud risk into the evaluation of other controls. Today, per COSO guidance, the adequacy of anti-fraud controls is specifically assessed as part of the evaluation of the control activities related to identified fraud risks. Managements that identify a gap related to the fraud risk assessments performed by CFEs and work to implement a robust assessment take away an increased focus on potential fraud scenarios specific to their organizations. Many such managements have implemented new processes, including CFE facilitated sessions with operating management, that allow executives to consider fraud in new ways. The fraud risk assessment can also raise management’s awareness of opportunities for fraud outside its areas of responsibility.

The blurred line of responsibility between an entity’s internal control system and those of outsourced providers creates a need for more rigorous controls over communication between parties. Previously, many companies looked to contracts, service-level agreements, and service organization reports as their approach to managing service organizations. Today, there is a need to go further. Specifically, there is a need for focus on the service providers’ internal processes and tone at the top. Implementing these additional areas of fraud risk assessment focus can increase visibility into the vendor’s performance, fraud prevention and general internal control structure.

Most people view risk as something that should be avoided or reduced. However, CFEs and other risk professionals realize that risk is valued when it can help achieve a competitive advantage. ACFE studies show that investors and other stakeholders place a premium on management’s ability to limit the uncertainty surrounding their performance projections, especially regarding fraud risk. With Information Technology budgets shrinking and more being asked from IT, outsourcing key components of IT or critical business processes to third-party cloud based providers is now common. Management should obtain a report on all the enterprise’s critical business applications and the related data that is managed by such providers. Top management should make sure that the organization has appropriate agreements in place with all service providers and that an appropriate audit of the provider’s operations, such as Service Organization Controls (SOC) 1 and SOC 2 assurance reports, is performed regularly by an independent party.

It’s also imperative that client management understand the safe harbor clauses in data breach laws for the countries and U.S. states where the organization does business.  In the United States, almost every state has enacted laws requiring organizations to notify the state in case of a data breach. The criteria defining what constitutes a data breach are similar in each state, with slight variations.

CFE vulnerability assessments should strive to impress on IT management that it should strive to make upper management aware of all major breach attempts, not just actual incidents, made against the organization. To see the importance of this it’s necessary only to open a newspaper and read about the serious data breaches occurring around the world on almost a daily basis. The definition of major may, of course, differ, depending on the organization’s industry and whether the organization is global, national, or local.  Additionally, top management and the board should plan to meet with the organization’s chief information security officer (CISO) at least once a year. This meeting should supplement the CFE’s annual update of the fraud risk assessment by helping management understand the state of cybersecurity within the organization and enabling top managers and directors to discuss key cybersecurity topics. It’s also important that the CISO is reporting to the appropriate levels within the organization. Keep in mind that although many CISOs continue to report within the IT organization, sometimes the chief information officer’s agenda conflicts with the CISO’s agenda. As such, the ACFE reports that a better reporting arrangement to promote independence is to migrate reporting lines to other officers such as the general counsel, chief operating officer, chief risk officer (CRO), or even the CEO, depending on the industry and the organization’s degree of dependence on technology.

As a matter of routine, every organization should establish relationships with the appropriate national and local authorities who have responsibility for cybersecurity or cybercrime response. For example, boards of U.S. companies should verify that management has protocols in place to guide contact with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in case of a breech; the FBI has established its Key Partnership Engagement Unit, a targeted outreach program to senior executives of major private-sector corporations.

If there is a Chief Risk Officer (CRO) or equivalent, upper management and the board should, as with the CISO, meet with him or her quarterly or, at the least, annually and review all the fraud related risks that were either avoided or accepted. There are times when a business unit will identify a technology need that its executive is convinced is the right solution for the organization, even though the technology solution may have potential security risks. The CRO should report to the board about those decisions by business-unit executives that have the potential to expose the organization to additional security risks.

And don’t forget that management should be made to verify that the organization’s cyber insurance coverage is sufficient to address potential cyber risks. To understand the total potential impact of a major data breach, the board should always ask management to provide the cost per record of a data breach.

No business can totally mitigate every fraud related cyber risk it faces, but every business must focus on the vulnerabilities that present the greatest exposure. Cyber risk management is a multifaceted function that manages acceptance and avoidance of risk against the necessary actions to operate the business for success and growth, and to meet strategic objectives. Every business needs to regard risk management as an ongoing conversation between its management and supporting professionals, a conversation whose importance requires participation by an organization’s audit committee and other board members, with the CFE and the CISO serving increasingly important roles.

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