Tag Archives: anti-fraud training

People, People & People

Our Chapter’s Vice-President Rumbi Petrolozzi’s comment in her last blog post to the effect that one of the most challenging tasks for the forensic accountant or auditor working proactively is defining the most effective and efficient scope of work for a risk-based assurance project. Because resources are always scarce, assurance professionals need to make sure they can meet both quality and scheduling requirements whilst staying within our fixed resource and cost constraints.

An essential step in defining the scope of a project is identifying the critical risks to review and the controls required to manage those risks. An efficient scope focuses on the subset of controls (i.e., the key controls) necessary to provide assurance. Performing tests of controls that are not critical is not efficient. Similarly, failing to test controls that could be the source of major fraud vulnerabilities leads to an ineffective audit.  As Rumbi points out, and too often overlooked, the root cause of most risk and control failures is people. After all, outstanding people are required to make an organization successful, and failing to hire, retain, and train a competent team of employees inevitably leads to business failure.

In an interview, a few decades ago, one of America’s most famous business leaders was asked what his greatest challenges were in turning one of his new companies around from failure to success. He is said to have responded that his three greatest challenges were “people, people, and people.” Certainly, when assurance professionals or management analyze the reasons for data breaches and control failures, people are generally found to be the root cause. For example, weaknesses may include (echoing Rumbi):

Insufficiently trained personnel to perform the work. A common material weakness in compliance with internal control over financial reporting requirements is a lack of experienced financial reporting personnel within a company. In more traditional anti-fraud process reviews, examiners often find that control weaknesses arise because individuals don’t understand the tasks they have to perform.

Insufficient numbers to perform the work. When CPAs find that important reconciliations are not performed timely, inventories are not counted, a backlog in transaction processing exists, or agreed-upon corrective actions to address prior audit findings aren’t completed, managers frequently offer the excuse that their area is understaffed.

Poor management and leadership. Fraud examiners find again and again, that micromanagers and dictators can destroy a solid finance function. At the other end of the spectrum, the absence of leadership, motivation, and communication can cause whole teams to flounder. Both situations generally lead to a failure to perform key controls consistently. For example, poor managers have difficulty retaining experienced professionals to perform account reconciliations on time and with acceptable levels of quality leading directly to an enhanced level of vulnerability to numerous fraud scenarios.

Ineffective human resource practices. In some cases, management may choose to accept a certain level of inefficiency and retain individuals who are not performing up to par. For instance, in an example cited by one of our ACFE training event speakers last year, the financial analysis group of a U.S. manufacturing company was failing to provide management with timely business information. Although the department was sufficiently staffed, the team members were ineffective. Still, management did not have the resolve to terminate poor performers, for fear it would not be possible to hire quality analysts to replace the people who were terminated.

In such examples, people-related weaknesses result in business process key control failures often leading to the facilitation of subsequent frauds. The key control failure was the symptom, and the people-related weakness was the root cause. As a result, the achievement of the business objective of fraud prevention is rendered at risk.

Consider a fraud examiner’s proactive assessment of an organization’s procurement function. If the examiner finds that all key controls are designed adequately and operating effectively, in compliance with company policy, and targeted cost savings are being generated, should s/he conclude the controls are adequate? What if that department has a staff attrition rate of 25 percent and morale is low? Does that change the fraud vulnerability assessment? Clearly, even if the standard set of controls were in place, the function would not be performing at optimal levels.  Just as people problems can lead to risk and control failures, exceptional people can help a company achieve success. In fact, an effective system of internal control considers the adequacy of controls not only to address the risks related to poor people-related management but also to recognize reduction in fraud vulnerability due to excellence in people-related management.

The people issue should be addressed in at least two phases of the assurance professional’s review process: planning and issue analysis (i.e., understanding weaknesses, their root cause, and the appropriate corrective actions).  In the planning phase, the examiner should consider how people-related anti-fraud controls might impact the review and which controls should be included in the scope. The following questions might be considered in relation to anti-fraud controls over staffing, organization, training, management and leadership, performance appraisals, and employee development:

–How significant would a failure of people-related controls be to the achievement of objectives and the management of business risk covered by the examination?
–How critical is excellence in people management to the achievement of operational excellence related to the objectives of the review?

Issue analysis requires a different approach. Reviewers may have to ask the question “why” three or more times before they get to the root cause of a problem. Consider the following little post-fraud dialogue (we’ve all heard variations) …

CFE: “Why weren’t the reconciliations completed on time?”
MANAGER. “Because we were busy closing the books and one staff member was on vacation.”
CFE: “You are still expected to complete the reconciliations, which are critical to closing the books. Even with one person on vacation, why were you too busy?”
MANAGER: “We just don’t have enough people to get everything done, even when we work through weekends and until late at night.”
CFE: “Why don’t you have enough people?”
MANAGER: “Management won’t let me hire anybody else because of cost constraints.”
CFE: “Why won’t management let you hire anybody? Don’t they realize the issue?”
MANAGER: “Well, I think they do, but I have been so busy that I may not have done an effective job of explaining the situation. Now that you are going to write this up as a control weakness, maybe they will.”

The root cause of the problem in this scenario is that the manager responsible for reconciliations failed to provide effective leadership. She did not communicate the problem and ensure she had sufficient resources to perform the work assigned. The root cause is a people problem, and the reviewer should address that directly in his or her final report. If the CFE only reports that the reconciliations weren’t completed on time, senior management might only press the manager to perform better without understanding the post-fraud need for both performance improvement and additional staff.

In many organizations, it’s difficult for a reviewer to discuss people issues with management, even when these issues can be seen to directly and clearly contribute to fraud vulnerably. Assurance professionals may find it tricky, for political reasons to recommend the hiring of additional staff or to explain that the existing staff members do not have the experience or training necessary to perform their assigned tasks. Additionally, we are likely to run into political resistance when reporting management and leadership failure. But, that’s the job assurance professionals are expected to perform; to provide an honest, objective assessment of the condition of critical anti-fraud controls including those related to people.  If the scope of our work does not consider people risks, or if reviewers are unable to report people-related weaknesses, we are not adding the value we should. We’re also failing to report on matters critical to the maintenance and extension of the client’s anti-fraud program.

The Sword of Damocles

The media provide us with daily examples of the fact that technology is a double-edged sword. The technological advancements that make it easy for people with legitimate purposes to engage with our client businesses and governmental agencies also provide a mechanism for those bent on perpetrating theft and frauds of all kinds.

The access to services and information that customers have historically demanded has opened the flood gates through which disgruntled or unethical employees and criminals enter to commit fraud. Criminals are also exploiting the inadequacies of older fraud management policies or, in some instances, the overall lack thereof. Our parent organization, the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) has estimated that about 70 percent of all companies around the world experienced some type of fraud in 2016, with total global losses due to fraud exceeding US $4 trillion annually and expected to rise continually.  Organizations have incurred, on average, the loss of an estimated 7 percent of their annual revenues to fraud, with $994 billion of that total in the US alone. The ACFE has also noted that the frauds reported lasted a median length of 18 months before being detected. In addition to the direct impact of revenue loss, fraud erodes customer satisfaction and drains investments that could have been directed to corporate innovation and growth. Organizations entrusted with personally identifiable information are also held directly accountable in the eyes of the public for any breach. Surveys have shown that about one-third of fraud victims avoid merchants they blame for their victimization.

We assurance professionals know that criminals become continuously more sophisticated and the fraud they perpetrate increasingly complex. In response, the requirements for fraud risk management have significantly changed over the last few years. Fraud risk management is now not a by-product, but a purposeful choice intended to mitigate or eliminate an organizations’ exposure to the ethically challenged. Fraud risk management is no longer a “once and done” activity, but has become an on-going, ideally concurrent, program. As with all effective processes, it must be performed according to some design. To counter fraud, an organization must first understand its unique situation and the risk to which it may be exposed. This cannot be accomplished in a vacuum or through divination, but through structured analysis of an organization’s current state. Organizations are compelled by their increasingly cyber supported environments to establish an appropriate enterprise fraud risk management framework aligned with the organization’s strategic objectives and supported by a well-planned road map leading the organization to its properly defined target state of protection. Performing adequate analysis of the current state and projecting the organization goals considering that desired state is essential.  Analysis is the bedrock for implementation of any enterprise fraud risk management framework to effectively manage fraud risk.

Fraud risk management is thus both a top-down and a bottom-up process. It’s critical for an organization to establish and implement the right policies, processes, technology and supporting components within the organization and to diligently enforce these policies and processes collaboratively and consistently to fight fraud effectively across the organization. To counter fraud at an enterprise level, organizations should develop an integrated counter fraud program that enables information sharing and collaboration; the goal is to prevent first, detect early, respond effectively, monitor continuously and learn constantly. Counter fraud experience in both the public and for-profit sectors has resulted in the identification of a few critical factors for the successful implementation of enterprise-wide fraud risk management in the present era of advanced technology and big data.

The first is fraud risk management by design. Organizations like the ACFE have increasingly acknowledged the continuously emerging pattern of innovative frauds and the urgency on the part of all organizations to manage fraud risk on a daily, concurrent basis.  As a result, organizations have attempted implementation of the necessary management processes and solutions. However, it is not uncommon that our client organizations find themselves lacking in the critical support components of such a program.  Accordingly, their fraud risk mitigation efforts tend to be poorly coordinated and, sometimes, even reactionary. The fraud risk management capabilities and technology solutions in place are generally implemented in silos and disconnected across the organization.  To coordinate and guide the effort, the ACFE recommends implementation of the following key components:

— A rigorous risk assessment process — An organization must have an effective fraud risk assessment process to systematically identify significant fraud risk and to determine its individual exposure to such risk. The assessment may be integrated with an overall risk assessment or performed as a stand-alone exercise, but it should, at a minimum, include risk identification, risk likelihood, significance assessment and risk response; a component for fraud risk mitigation and implementation of compensating controls across the critical business processes composing the enterprise is also necessary for cost-effective fraud management.

–Effective governance and clearly defined organizational responsibilities — Organizations must commit to an effective governance process providing oversight of the fraud management process. The central fraud risk management program must be equipped with a clear charter and accountability that will provide direction and oversight for counter fraud efforts. The fraud risk must be managed enterprise-wide with transparency and communication integrated across the organization. The formally designated fraud risk program owner must be at a level from which clear management guidelines can be communicated and implemented.

–An integrated counter fraud framework and approach — An organization-wide counter fraud framework that covers the complete landscape of fraud management (from enterprise security, authentication, business process, and application policy and procedure controls, to transaction monitoring and management), should be established. What we should be looking for as CFEs in evaluating a client’s program is a comprehensive counter fraud approach to continually enhance the consistency and efficacy of fraud management processes and practices.

–A coordinated network of counter fraud capabilities — An organization needs a structured, coordinated system of interconnected capabilities (not a point solution) implemented through management planning and proper oversight and governance. The system should ideally leverage the capabilities of big data and consider a broad set of attributes (e.g., identity, relationships, behaviors, patterns, anomalies, visualization) across multiple processes and systems. It should be transparent across users and provide guidance and alerts that enable timely and smart anti-fraud related decisions across the organization.

Secondly, a risk-based approach. No contemporary organization gets to stand still on the path to fraud risk management. Criminals are not going to give organizations a time-out to plug any holes and upgrade their arsenal of analytical tools. Organizations must adopt a risk-based approach to address areas and processes of highest risk exposures immediately, while planning for future fraud prevention enhancements. Countering fraud is an ongoing and continually evolving process, and the journey to the desired target state is a balancing act across the organization.

Thirdly, continual organizational collaboration and systemic learning. Fraud detection and prevention is not merely an information-gathering exercise and technology adoption, but an entire life cycle with continuous feedback and improvement. It requires the organization’s commitment to, and implementation of continual systemic learning, data sharing, and communication. The organization also needs to periodically align the enterprise counter fraud program with its strategic plan.

Fourthly, big data and advanced analytics.  Technological breakthroughs and capabilities grounded in big data and analytics can help prevent and counter fraudulent acts that impact the bottom line and threaten brand value and customer retention. Big data technology can ingest data from any source, regardless of structure, volume or velocity. It can harness, filter and sift through terabytes of data, whether in motion or at rest, to identify and relate the elements of information that really matter to the detection of on-going as well as of potential frauds. Big data off-the-shelf solutions already provide the means to detect instances of fraud, waste, abuse, financial crimes, improper payments, and more. Big data solutions can also reduce complexity across lines of business and allow organizations to manage fraud pervasively throughout the entire life cycle of any business process.

In summary, smart organizations manage the sword of potential fraud threats with well-planned road maps supported by proper organization and governance.  They analyze their state to understand where they are, and implement an integrated framework of standard management processes to provide the guidance and methodology for effective, ethics based, concurrent anti-fraud practice. The management of fraud risk is an integral part of their overall risk culture; a support system of interconnected counter fraud capabilities integrated across systems and processes, enabled by a technology strategy and supporting formal enterprise level oversight and governance.

With a Little Help

by Rumbi Petrozzello, CPA/CFF, CFE
2018 Vice-President – Central Virginia Chapter ACFE

In November, my husband and I headed out to our usual spot, on Fourth Avenue in Brooklyn, to cheer for those running the New York marathon. A marathon, for those who don’t know, is 26.2 miles long. People who complete marathons get nothing but respect from me – success in marathoning only comes with a lot of dedication and training. Many people spend at least six months following a training plan that is not just about building distance. For instance, when learning (and it is learning) how to complete 26.2 miles of running (or walking for that matter) people must learn how to remain fueled and hydrated while running. This training also then applies to making lifestyle adjustments such as changing one’s diet and sleeping habits. Years ago, when I was training for the New York Marathon, friends knew to not call after 10PM because I was going to bed early to get enough sleep before early morning runs. I tried not to go out on Friday nights, because I went on my long runs on Saturday mornings and wanted to be energized for them. I spent a lot of time and energy doing research, talking to friends who were seasoned runners and even took running classes to improve my performance and chances of success during the race. Despite the very popular tag line “Just Do It”, a lot of work goes into even getting to that point.

The past few months, I have been doing quite a bit of work that involves assessing the controls that companies have over their systems to detect, deter and prevent fraud and error. Going in, the time energy and money that companies have put into all of this is impressive. They will have an audit committee, an internal audit function and a lot of documentation around what their systems are. There will be volumes of documentation on procedures and protocols and, at the very least, on paper, things look fantastic. However, when we start talking to employees about what their reality is, things often are very different. Some of the issues we found included:

• Staff who did not quite understand what some technical terms meant and, so ignored the parts they didn’t understand. We spoke with people who were very happy to perform and review controls, but they didn’t know how best to do that, and no one was telling them the how;

• Some staff did not understand why they were being asked to change things and, believing that what they had been doing for years constituted a good system, stuck with that;

• In some cases, it wasn’t clear just who was responsible for ownership of a process and that meant, often, that nothing ended up getting done;

• In other instances, staff were given such vague instructions that they resorted to making it up as they went along.

Having the rules is completely useless if your people don’t know what do with them and, just as importantly, why they’re doing what they’ve been asked to do in the first place. What is vital in all of this, is the proper training. As CFEs and Forensic Accountants, we are perfectly positioned to work with clients to ensure that controls and systems go beyond theory. So it’s vitally important for success to constantly work with clients to strengthen systems and controls. This can be done by recommending that our corporate clients:

• Provide training to employees. This training must include the identification of control owners and then the process of working directly with them to ensure that they understand what their roles are and specifically why they need to follow the steps being asked of them. Sometimes, when a control owner is given a requested role, they are told to “review” something. Review can mean anything and often what some people consider to be a review is insufficient for complete understanding. For instance, an employee may think that merely saying they checked something is sufficient. Or that having a verbal conversation is enough proof of review. Be sure to recommend to clients that they let employees know that there should be written evidence of a mandated review and to be equally sure to provide clear examples of what qualifies as evidence of that review.

• Review systems and controls to ensure that they address risks. A company may institute many systems and related procedures but, upon review, a CFE or forensic accountant may find inadequate segregation of duties. You may find that a supervisor is checking a team’s work, but no one is authorizing that supervisor’s. This becomes particularly risky if that supervisor has access to many aspects of the business. A CFE or forensic accountant, can review roles and duties to ensure that duties are sufficiently segregated.

• Training should be ongoing and updated for changes in the company as well as changes in technology and processes. At least once a year, employees should receive updated training and performance reviews. In this way, companies can also learn if there have been material changes that might lead to systems and processes having been adjusted in such a way as to create weakness and holes that could lead to future fraud or error.

It’s all well and good to have ads where famous people run, jump and play and tell you to “just do it”. I remember people rolling their eyes at me when I mentioned that I was dashing to running class – why do you have to learn how to run? Doesn’t everyone know how to do that? Yes, I could run, but with training, I ran a better marathon and lived to tell the tale (unlike the original guy). Yes, employees may know how to do the compliance and control work but as a CFE or forensic accountant, you can help a client company work with their employees to perform their work better, be aware of controls and be cognizant of risk and how to mitigate it. It’s so much better than just doing it.

Internal Auditors as Fraud Auditors

Although fraud prevention is always more effective and less costly than fraud detection (and subsequent investigation), unfortunately prevention is not always possible. That’s why, as CFE’s and forensic accountants we should all be heavy promoters (and supporters) of client internal audit functions.  That is also why we should make it a goal that all employees of our client companies be trained in how to identify the major red flags of fraud they may encounter in their daily activities. Mastering key detection techniques is doubly essential for the internal audit and financial professionals employed by those same enterprises. Our Chapter has long preached that once internal auditors and financial managers know what to look for, there is an enhanced chance that fraud or suspicious activity will be detected one way or another, but only if the organization has the proper monitoring, reporting, and auditing procedures in place.

With that said, many organizations require internal audits of specific business processes and units only once every two or three years. In an age when so much can change so quickly in an internet dominated world, this approach is not the most effective insofar as fraud detection and prevention are concerned. This is especially so because conventional audits were most often not designed to detect fraud in the first place, usually focusing on specified groups of internal controls or compliance with existing policies, laws and regulations. That’s why the ACFE and Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) now recommend that a fraud risk assessment (FRA) be conducted annually and that the fraud-auditing procedures designed to detect red flags in the high-risk areas identified by the FRA be incorporated into internal audit plans immediately.

There is often a fine line between detection and prevention. In fact, some detection steps overlap with prevention methods, as in the case of conflict of interest, where enforcing a management financial disclosure policy may both detect conflicting financial interests and prevent frauds resulting from them by virtue of the actual detection of the relationships. In most organizations, however, carefully assessing the description of prevention and detection controls demonstrates that there is usually a clear distinction between the two.

The IIA tell us that the internal audit function is a critical element in assessing the effectiveness of an institution’s internal control system. The internal audit consists of procedures to prevent or identify significant inaccurate, incomplete, or unauthorized transactions; deficiencies in safeguarding assets; unreliable financial reporting; and deviations from laws, regulations, and institutional policies. When properly designed and implemented, internal audits provide directors and senior management with timely information about weaknesses in the internal control system, facilitating prompt remedial action. Each institution should have an internal audit function appropriate to its size and the nature and scope of its activities.

This is a complex way of saying that our client’s internal audit function should focus on monitoring the institution’s internal controls, which, although not mentioned explicitly, include controls specifically designed to prevent fraud.  To effectively assess anti-fraud controls, auditors first must exercise detection techniques and procedures that confirm the existence of red flags or actual evidence of potential fraud in the risk areas identified by the FRA.

The Chief Internal Auditor is typically responsible for the following:

–Performing, or contracting for, a control risk assessment documenting the internal auditor’s understanding of significant business activities and associated risks. These assessments typically analyze the risks inherent in each business line, the mitigating control processes, and the resulting residual risk exposure;

–An internal audit plan responsive to results of the control risk assessment. This plan typically specifies key internal control summaries within each business activity, the timing and frequency of internal audit work, and the resource budget;

–An internal audit program that describes audit objectives and specifies procedures performed during each internal audit review;

–An audit report presenting the purpose, scope, and results of each audit. Work papers should be maintained to document the work performed and support audit findings.

There is a joint ACFE-IIA-AICPA document with which every CFE should be familiar.  ‘The Business Risk of Fraud’ provides clarity about the internal auditor’s role in detecting fraud in our client organization’s operations and financial statements. Specifically, the document states that internal auditors should consider the organization’s assessment of fraud risk when developing their annual audit plan and periodically assess management’s fraud detection capabilities. They should also interview and regularly communicate with those conducting the assessments, as well as with others in key positions throughout the company, to help them assess whether all fraud risks have been considered. Moreover, according to the document, when performing audits, internal auditors should devote sufficient time and attention to evaluating the “design and operation” of internal controls related to preventing and detecting significant fraud risks. They should exercise professional skepticism when reviewing activities to be on guard for the signs of potential fraud. Potential frauds uncovered during an engagement should be treated in accordance with a well-defined response plan consistent with professional and legal standards.

Among the most helpful guides for CFEs to recommend to clients for their internal auditors use in planning a detailed audit to detect fraud is the all-important SAS 99 which contains key fraud detection techniques including guidance on the performance of certain financial ratio analysis. Analytical procedures performed during planning may be helpful in identifying the risks of material misstatement due to fraud. However, because such analytical procedures generally use data aggregated at a high level, the results of those analytical procedures provide only a broad initial indication about whether a material misstatement of the financial statements may exist. Accordingly, the results of analytical procedures performed during planning should be considered along with other information gathered by the auditor in identifying the risks of material misstatement due to fraud.

SAS 99 was formulated with the aim of detecting fraud that has a direct impact on “material misstatement.” Essentially this means that anything in the organization’s financial activities that could result in fraud-related misstatements in its financial records should be audited for by using SAS 99 as a guide. SAS 99 breaks down the potential fraudulent causes of material misstatement into two categories:

1. Misstatement due to fraudulent financial reporting (i.e., “book cooking”);

2. Misstatement due to misappropriation of assets (i.e., theft).

The fraud auditing procedures of SAS 99, or of any other reputable audit guidance, can greatly assist internal auditors in distinguishing between actual fraud and error. Often the two have similar characteristics, with the key difference being that of the existence or absence of intent. Toward this end, SAS 99 and other key fraud auditing guidelines provide detailed procedures for gathering evidence of potential fraud based on the lists of fraud risks resulting from the client’s FRA. As SAS 99 states:

‘SAS 99. . . strongly recommend[s] direct involvement by internal auditors in the organization’s fraud-auditing efforts: Internal auditors may conduct proactive auditing to search for corruption, misappropriation of assets, and financial statement fraud. This may include the use of computer-assisted audit techniques to detect types of fraud. Internal auditors also can employ analytical and other procedures to isolate anomalies and perform detailed reviews of high-risk accounts and transactions to identify potential financial statement fraud. The internal auditors should have an independent reporting line directly to the audit committee, enabling them to express any concerns about management’s commitment to appropriate internal controls or to report suspicions or allegations of fraud involving senior management.

Specifically, SAS 99 provides a set of audit responses designed to gather hard evidence of potential fraud that could exist based on what the client organization learned from its FRA. These responses are critical to the auditor’s success in identifying clear red flags of potential fraud in our client’s operations. The responses are wide ranging and include anything from the application of appropriate ratio analytics, to thorough and detailed testing of controls governing specific business process procedures, to the analysis of anomalies in vendor or customer account activity. There are three broad categories into which such detailed internal audit fraud auditing responses fall:

1. The nature of auditing procedures performed may need to be changed to obtain evidence that is more reliable or to obtain additional corroborative information;
2. The timing of substantive tests may need to be modified. The auditor might conclude that substantive testing should be performed at or near the end of the reporting period to best address an identified risk of material misstatement due to fraud;
3. The extent of the procedures applied should reflect the assessment of the risks of material misstatement due to fraud. For example, increasing sample sizes or performing analytical procedures at a more detailed level may be appropriate.

The contribution of a fully staffed and management-supported internal audit function to a subsequent CFE conducted fraud examination can be extraordinary and its value never overstated; no client fraud prevention and detection program should ever be considered complete without one.

Help for the Little Guy

It’s clear to the news media and to every aware assurance professional that today’s cybercriminals are more sophisticated than ever in their operations and attacks. They’re always on the lookout for innovative ways to exploit vulnerabilities in every global payment system and in the cloud.

According to the ACFE, more consumer records were compromised in 2015-16 than in the previous four years combined. Data breach statistics from this year (2017) are projected to be even grimmer due to the growth of increasingly sophisticated attack methods such as increasingly complex malware infections and system vulnerability exploits, which grew tenfold in 2016. With attacks coming in many different forms and from many different channels, consumers, businesses and financial institutions (often against their will) are being forced to gain a better understanding of how criminals operate, especially in ubiquitous channels like social networks. They then have a better chance of mitigating the risks and recognizing attacks before they do severe damage.

As your Chapter has pointed out over the years in this blog, understanding the mechanics of data theft and the conversion process of stolen data into cash can help organizations of all types better anticipate in the exact ways criminals may exploit the system, so that organizations can put appropriate preventive measures in place. Classic examples of such criminal activity include masquerading as a trustworthy entity such as a bank or credit card company. These phishers send e-mails and instant messages that prompt users to reply with sensitive information such as usernames, passwords and credit card details, or to enter the information at a rogue web site. Other similar techniques include using text messaging (SMSishing or smishing) or voice mail (vishing) or today’s flood of offshore spam calls to lure victims into giving up sensitive information. Whaling is phishing targeted at high-worth accounts or individuals, often identified through social networking sites such as LinkedIn or Facebook. While it’s impossible to anticipate or prevent every attack, one way to stay a step ahead of these criminals is to have a thorough understanding of how such fraudsters operate their enterprises.

Although most cyber breaches reported recently in the news have struck large companies such as Equifax and Yahoo, the ACFE tells us that small and mid-sized businesses suffer a far greater number of devastating cyber incidents. These breaches involve organizations of every industry type; all that’s required for vulnerability is that they operate network servers attached to the internet. Although the number of breached records a small to medium sized business controls is in the hundreds or thousands, rather than in the millions, the cost of these breaches can be higher for the small business because it may not be able to effectively address such incidents on its own.  Many small businesses have limited or no resources committed to cybersecurity, and many don’t employ any assurance professionals apart from the small accounting firms performing their annual financial audit. For these organizations, the key questions are “Where should we focus when it comes to cybersecurity?” and “What are the minimum controls we must have to protect the sensitive information in our custody?” Fraud Examiners and forensic accountants with client attorneys assisting small businesses can assist in answering these questions by checking that their client attorney’s organizations implement a few vital cybersecurity controls.

First, regardless of their industry, small businesses must ensure their network perimeter is protected. The first step is identifying the vulnerabilities by performing an external network scan at least quarterly. A small business can either hire an outside company to perform these scans, or, if they have small in-house or contracted IT, they can license off-the-shelf software to run the scans, themselves. Moreover, small businesses need a process in place to remedy the identified critical, high, and medium vulnerabilities within three months of the scan run date, while low vulnerabilities are less of a priority. The fewer vulnerabilities the perimeter network has,
the less chance that an external hacker will breach the organization’s network.

Educating employees about their cybersecurity responsibilities is not a simple check-sheet matter. Smaller businesses not only need help in implementing an effective information security policy, they also need to ensure employees are aware of the policy and of their responsibilities. The policy and training should cover:

–Awareness of phishing attacks;
–Training on ransomware management;
–Travel tips;
–Potential threats of social engineering;
–Password protection;
–Risks of storing sensitive data in the cloud;
–Accessing corporate information from home computers and other personal devices;
–Awareness of tools the organization provides for securely sending emails or sharing large files;
–Protection of mobile devices;
–Awareness of CEO spoofing attacks.

In addition, small businesses should verify employees’ level of awareness by conducting simulation exercises. These can be in the form of a phishing exercise in which organizations themselves send fake emails to their employees to see if they will click on a web link, or a social engineering exercise in which a hired individual tries to enter the organization’s physical location and steal sensitive information such as information on computer screens left in plain sight.

In small organizations, sensitive information tends to proliferate across various platforms and folders. For example, employees’ personal information typically resides in human resources software or with a cloud service provider, but through various downloads and reports, the information can proliferate to shared drives and folders, laptops, emails, and even cloud folders like Dropbox or Google Drive. Assigned management at the organization should check that the organization has identified the sites of such proliferation to make sure it has a good handle on the state of all the organization’s sensitive information:

–Inventory all sensitive business processes and the related IT systems. Depending on the organization’s industry, this information could include customer information, pricing data, customers’ credit card information, patients’ health information, engineering data, or financial data;
–For each business process, identify an information owner who has complete authority to approve user access to that information;
–Ensure that the information owner periodically reviews access to all the information he or she owns and updates the access list.

Organizations should make it hard to get to their sensitive data by building layers or network segments. Although the network perimeter is an organization’s first line of defense, the probability of the network being penetrated is today at an all-time high. Management should check whether the organization has built a layered defense to protect its sensitive information. Once the organization has identified its sensitive information, management should work with the IT function to segment those servers that run its sensitive applications.  This segmentation will result in an additional layer of protection for these servers, typically by adding another firewall for the segment. Faced with having to penetrate another layer of defense, an intruder may decide to go elsewhere where less sensitive information is stored.

An organization’s electronic business front door also can be the entrance for fraudsters and criminals. Most of today’s malware enters through the network but proliferates through the endpoints such as laptops and desktops. At a minimum, internal small business management must ensure that all the endpoints are running anti-malware/anti-virus software. Also, they should check that this software’s firewall features are enabled. Moreover, all laptop hard drives should be encrypted.

In addition to making sure their client organizations have implemented these core controls, assurance professionals should advise small business client executives to consider other protective controls:

–Monitor the network. Network monitoring products and services can provide real-time alerts in case there is an intrusion;
–Manage service providers. Organizations should inventory all key service providers and review all contracts for appropriate security, privacy, and data breach notification language;
–Protect smart devices. Increasingly, company information is stored on mobile devices. Several off-the-shelf solutions can manage and protect the information on these devices. Small businesses should ensure they are able to wipe the sensitive information from these devices if they are lost or stolen;
–Monitor activity related to sensitive information. Management IT should log activities against their sensitive information and keep an audit log in case an incident occurs and they need to review the logs to evaluate the incident.

Combined with the controls listed above, these additional controls can help any small business reduce the probability of a data breach. But a security program is only as strong as its weakest link Through their assurance and advisory work, CFE’s and forensic accountants can proactively help identify these weaknesses and suggest ways to strengthen their smaller client organization’s anti-fraud defenses.

Fraud Risk Assessing the Trusted Insider

A bank employee accesses her neighbor’s accounts on-line and discloses this information to another person living in the neighborhood; soon everyone seems to be talking about the neighbor’s financial situation. An employee of a mutual fund company accesses his father-in-law’s accounts without a legitimate reason or permission from the unsuspecting relative and uses the information to pressure his wife into making a bad investment from which the father-in-law, using money from the fund account, ultimately pays to extricate his daughter. Initially, out of curiosity, an employee at a local hospital accesses admission records of a high-profile athlete whom he recognized in the emergency room but then shares that information (for a price) with a tabloid newspaper reporter who prints a story.

Each of these is an actual case and each is a serious violation of various Federal privacy laws. Each of these three scenarios were not the work of an anonymous intruder lurking in cyberspace or of an identity thief who compromised a data center. Rather, this database browsing was perpetrated by a trusted insider, an employee whose daily duties required them to have access to vast databases housing financial, medical and educational information. From the comfort and anonymity of their workstations, similar employees are increasingly capable of accessing personal information for non-business reasons and, sometimes, to support the accomplishment of actual frauds. The good news is that CFE’s can help with targeted fraud risk assessments specifically tailored to assess the probability of this threat type and then to advise management on an approach to its mitigation.

The Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission’s (COSO’s) 2013 update of the Internal Control Integrated Framework directs organizations to conduct a fraud risk assessment as part of their overall risk assessment. The discussion of fraud in COSO 2013 centers on Principle 8: “The organization considers the potential for fraud in assessing risks to the achievement of objectives.” Under the 1992 COSO framework, most organizations viewed fraud risk primarily in terms of satisfying the U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requirements to identify fraud controls to prevent or detect fraud risk at the transaction level. In COSO 2013, fraud risk becomes a specific component of the overall risk assessment that focuses on fraud at the entity and transaction levels. COSO now requires a strong internal control foundation that addresses fraud broadly to encompass company objectives as part of its strategy, operations, compliance, and reporting. Principle 8 describes four specific areas: fraudulent financial reporting, fraudulent nonfinancial reporting, misappropriation of assets, and illegal acts. The inclusion of non-financial reporting is a meaningful change that addresses sustainability, health and safety, employment activity and similar reports.

One useful document for performing a fraud risk assessment is Managing the Business Risk of Fraud: A Practical Guide, produced by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and by our organization, the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, as well as by the Institute of Internal Auditors. This guide to establishing a fraud risk management program includes a sample fraud policy document, fraud prevention scorecard, and lists of fraud exposures and controls. Managing the Business Risk of Fraud advises organizations to view fraud risk assessment as part of their corporate governance effort. This commitment requires a tone at the top that embraces strong governance practices, including written policies that describe the expectations of the board and senior management regarding fraud risk. The Guide points out that as organizations continue to automate key processes and implement technology, thus allowing employees broad access to sensitive data, misuse of that data becomes increasingly difficult to detect and prevent. By combining aggressive data collection strategies with innovative technology, public and private sector organizations have enjoyed dramatic improvements in productivity and service delivery that have contributed to their bottom line. Unfortunately, while these practices have yielded major societal benefits, they have also created a major challenge for those charged with protecting confidential data.

CFE’s proactively assessing client organizations which use substantial amounts of private customer information (PCI) for fraud risk should expect to see the presence of controls related to data access surveillance. Data surveillance is the systematic monitoring of information maintained in an automated, usually in a database, environment. The kinds of controls CFE’s should look for are the presence of a privacy strategy that combines the establishment of a comprehensive policy, an awareness program that reinforces the consequences of non-business accesses, a monitoring tool that provides for ongoing analysis of database activity, an investigative function to resolve suspect accesses and a disciplinary component to hold violators accountable.

The creation of an enterprise confidentiality policy on the front end of the implementation of a data surveillance program is essential to its success. An implementing organization should establish a data access policy that clearly explains the relevant prohibitions, provides examples of prohibited activity and details the consequences of non-business accesses. This policy must apply to all employees, regardless of their title, seniority or function. The AICP/ACFE Guide recommends that all employees, beginning with the CEO, be required to sign an annual acknowledgment affirming that they have received and read the confidentiality policy and understand that violations will result in the imposition of disciplinary action. No employees are granted access to any system housing confidential data until they have first signed the acknowledgment.

In addition to issuing a policy, it is imperative that organizations formally train employees regarding its various provisions and caution them on the consequences of accessing data for non-business purposes. During the orientation process for new hires, all employees should receive specialized training on the confidentiality policy. As an added reminder, prior to logging on to any database that contains personal information, employees should receive an electronic notice stating that their activities are being monitored and that all accesses must be related to an official business purpose. Employees are not granted access into the system until they electronically acknowledge this notice.

Given that data surveillance is a process of ongoing monitoring of database activity, it is necessary for individual accesses to be captured and maintained in a format conducive to analysis. There are many commercially available software tools which can be used to monitor access to relational databases on a real-time basis. Transaction tracking technology, as one example, can dynamically generate Structured Query Language (SQL), based upon various search criteria, and provides the capability for customized analyses within each application housing confidential data. The search results are available in Microsoft Excel, PDF and table formats, and may be printed, e-mailed and archived.

Our CFE client organizations that establish a data access policy and formally notify all employees of the provisions of that policy, institute an ongoing awareness program to reinforce the policy and implement technology to track individual accesses of confidential data have taken the initial steps toward safeguarding data. These are necessary components of a data surveillance program and serve as the foundation upon which the remainder of the process may be based. That said, it is critical that organizations not rely solely on these components, as doing so will result in an unwarranted sense of security. Without an ongoing monitoring process to detect questionable database activity and a comprehensive investigative function to address unauthorized accesses, the impact of the foregoing measures will be marginal.

The final piece of a data surveillance program is the disciplinary process. The ACFE tells us that employees who willfully violate the policy prohibiting nonbusiness access of confidential information must be disciplined; the exact nature of which discipline should be determined by executive management. Without a structured disciplinary process, employees will realize that their database browsing, even if detected, will not result in any consequence and, therefore, they will not be deterred from this type of misconduct. Without an effective disciplinary component, an organization’s privacy protection program will ultimately fail.

The bottom line is that our client organizations that maintain confidential data need to develop measures to protect this asset from internal as well as from external misuse, without imposing barriers that restrict their employees’ ability to perform their duties. In today’s environment, those who are perceived as being unable to protect the sensitive data entrusted to them will inevitably experience an erosion of consumer confidence, and the accompanying consequences. Data surveillance deployed in conjunction with a clear data access policy, an ongoing employee awareness program, an innovative monitoring process, an effective investigative function and a standardized disciplinary procedure are the component controls the CFE should look for when conducting a proactive fraud risk assessment of employee access to PCI.

Beyond the Sniff Test

Many years ago, I worked with a senior auditor colleague (who was also an attorney) who was always talking about applying what he called “the sniff test” to any financial transaction that might represent an ethical challenge.   Philosophical theories provide the bases for useful practical decision approaches and aids like my friend’s sniff test, although we can expect that most of the executives and professional accountants we work with as CFEs are unaware of exactly how and why this is so. Most seasoned directors, executives, and professional accountants, however, have developed tests and commonly used rules of thumb that can be used to assess the ethicality of decisions on a preliminary basis. To their minds, if these preliminary tests give rise to concerns, a more thorough analysis should be performed using any number of defined approaches and techniques.

After having heard him use the term several times, I asked my friend him if he could define it.  He thought about it that morning and later, over lunch, he boiled it down to a series of questions he would ask himself:

–Would I be comfortable as a professional if this action or decision of my client were to appear on the front page of a national newspaper tomorrow morning?
–Will my client be proud of this decision tomorrow?
–Would my client’s mother be proud of this decision?
–Is this action or decision in accord with the client corporation’s mission and code?
–Does this whole thing, in all its apparent aspects and ramifications, feel right to me?

Unfortunately, for their application in actual practice, although sniff tests and commonly used rules are based on ethical principles and are often preliminarily useful, they rarely, by themselves, represent a sufficiently comprehensive examination of the decision in question and so can leave the individuals and client corporations involved vulnerable to making unethical decisions.  For this reason, more comprehensive techniques involving the impact on client stakeholders should be employed whenever a proposed decision is questionable or likely to have significant consequences.

The ACFE tells us that many individual decision makers still don’t recognized the importance of stakeholder’s expectations of rightful conduct. If they did, the decisions made by corporate executives and by accountants and lawyers involved in the Enron, Arthur Andersen, WorldCom, Tyco, Adephia, and a whole host of others right up to the present day, might have avoided the personal and organizational tragedies that occurred. Some executives were motivated by greed rather than by enlightened self-interest focused on the good of all. Others went along with unethical decisions because they did not recognize that they were expected to behave differently and had a duty to do so. Some reasoned that because everyone else was doing something similar, how could it be wrong? The point is that they forgot to consider sufficiently the ethical practice (and duties) they were expected to demonstrate. Where a fiduciary duty was owed to future shareholders and other stakeholders, the public and personal virtues expected (character traits such as integrity, professionalism, courage, and so on), were not sufficiently considered. In retrospect, it would have been wise to include the assessment of ethical expectations as a separate step in any Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) process to strengthen governance and risk management systems and guard against unethical, short-sighted decisions.

It’s also evident that employees who continually make decisions for the wrong reasons, even if the right consequences result, can represent a high governance risk.  Many examples exist where executives motivated solely by greed have slipped into unethical practices, and others have been misled by faulty incentive systems. Sears Auto Center managers were selling repair services that customers did not need to raise their personal commission remuneration, and ultimately caused the company to lose reputation and future revenue.  Many of the classic financial scandals of recent memory were caused by executives who sought to manipulate company profits to support or inflate the company’s share price to boost their own stock option gains. Motivation based too narrowly on self-interest can result in unethical decisions when proper self-guidance and/or external monitoring is lacking. Because external monitoring is unlikely to capture all decisions before implementation, it is important for all employees to clearly understand the broad motivation that will lead to their own and their organization’s best interest from a stakeholder perspective.

Consequently, decision makers should take motivations and behavior expected by stakeholders into account specifically in any comprehensive ERM approach, and organizations should require accountability by employees for those expectations through governance mechanisms. Several aspects of ethical behavior have been identified as being indicative of mens rea (a guilty mind).  If personal or corporate behavior does not meet shareholder ethical expectations, there will probably be a negative impact on reputation and the ability to reach strategic objectives on a sustained basis in the medium and long term.

The stakeholder impact assessment broadens the criteria of the preliminary sniff test by offering an opportunity to assess the motivations that underlie the proposed decision or action. Although it is unlikely that an observer will be able to know with precision the real motivations that go through a decision maker’s mind, it is quite possible to project the perceptions that stakeholders will have of the action. In the minds of stakeholders, perceptions will determine reputational impacts whether those perceptions are correct or not. Moreover, it is possible to infer from remuneration and other motivational systems in place whether the decision maker’s motivation is likely to be ethical or not. To ensure a comprehensive ERM approach, in addition to projecting perceptions and evaluating motivational systems, the decisions or actions should be challenged by asking such questions as:

Does the decision or action involve and exhibit the integrity, fairness, and courage expected? Alternatively, does the decision or action involve and exhibit the motivation, virtues, and character expected?

Beyond the simple sniff test, stakeholder impact analysis offers a formal way of bringing into a decision the needs of an organization and its individual constituents (society). Trade-offs are difficult to make, and can benefit from such advances in technique. It is important not to lose sight of the fact that the concepts of stakeholder impact analysis need to be applied together as a set, not as stand-alone techniques. Only then will a comprehensive analysis be achieved and an ethical decision made.

Depending on the nature of the decision to be faced, and the range of stakeholders to be affected, a proper analysis could be based on any of the historical approaches to ethical decision making as elaborated by ACFE training and discussed so often in this blog.  A professional CFE can use stakeholder analysis in making decisions about financial fraud investigations, fraud related accounting issues, auditing procedures, and general practice matters, and should be ready to prepare or assist in such analyses for employers or clients just as is currently the case in other areas of fraud examination. Although many hard-numbers-oriented executives and accountants will be wary of becoming involved with the “soft” subjective analysis that typifies stakeholder and ethical expectations analysis, they should bear in mind that the world is changing to put a much higher value on non-numerical information. They should be wary of placing too much weight on numerical analysis lest they fall into the trap of the economist, who, as Oscar Wilde put it: “knew the price of everything and the value of nothing.”

Who’s the Boss?

anonymous_maskRumbi Petrozzello, CPA/CFF, CFE
2016 Vice-President – Central Virginia Chapter ACFE

A few weeks ago, I called my aunt and found her quite frazzled. When I asked her what was wrong, she told me about a phone call she had received the day before. The man on the other end of the line claimed to be an IRS agent. He was calling, he said, because she owed a substantial amount of money to the IRS. My aunt was confused because she has faithfully filed tax returns and paid what was due every year. In response, the alleged IRS agent said that her returns had been reviewed and that, due to errors, she owed a lot of money to the IRS and, if she did not pay immediately she would be imprisoned and would lose her Green Card.

Now, my aunt has only recently been approved for permanent residency and, when this call came in, the physical Green Card had not yet arrived in the mail. At his point my aunt started to panic. She did not want to lose her Green Card but, at the same time, she could not understand how she suddenly owed money to the IRS, money she certainly did not have on hand to pay. Then she started to cry. Her daughter, my cousin, happened to walk into the room at that moment and, seeing her mother in such a state, she grabbed the phone and demanded an explanation from whomever was on the line. Fortunately, my cousin immediately identified the scam. She knew that this is never how the IRS goes about trying to collect tax revenue. The IRS will not call you and demand tax payment immediately. And the IRS always gives you the opportunity to dispute a tax bill.

The IRS will never call you to say the police are on their way to arrest you; the IRS will never threaten that you will lose your driver’s license, Green Card or passport; and the IRS will not demand that you go to a money transfer company to send them cash or ask for credit card information over the phone … all demands that these types of scammers routinely make.

So my cousin yelled at the man on the phone and the man, realizing that he had been busted, hung up. My aunt, as I’m sure most readers of this blog know, is not alone, ether as a victim or in her vulnerability.  Just the other day, I listened to a Planet Money podcast, where a woman received a fake IRS call that included the voice of a second man claiming to be a police officer declaring he was on his way to arrest the victim. The caller ID even said 911!  The woman, in a panic even went so far as to go to Western Union and initiate a money transfer. Fortunately, for her, Western Union realized that this was a scam and saved this woman her money. These scammers bank on the power of the authority of institutions such as the IRS and impersonations of the police force to intimidate people into handing over their money with no questions allowed.

Impersonation frauds often feature an email, appearing to come from a high-ranking executive in a company, copied to a lower level employee. This lower level employee is usually someone who has responsibility for, and, therefore, direct access to, the process of transferring payments to vendors.  The text of the fake email instructs the lower-level employee to make a payment to a vendor. This type of scam e-mail tends to have several defining characteristics:

  • Examination of the email header will reveal that it does not come from the executive or even from within the company. For instance, if the email domain of the company is TheCompany.com then the fake domain may be TheCopmany.com. Close enough to be missed by a casual glance but not the same.
  • Sometimes scammers will hack the spoofed sending executive’s email, so the fake request appears to be coming from a legitimate, but actually compromised, email address.
  • Often the executives spoofed as sending this email may not be immediately accessible to the employee – either because they are out of town or because the lines of communication between the employee and executive are convoluted and difficult to access.
  • The instructions will state that the need for payment is urgent and that the employee must do so immediately.
  • Altered payment terms. For a well-known vendor paid regularly, the email will contain new payment instructions to pay into a different bank account from that on record, usually to a foreign, off-shore bank account.

Lower level employees, because they’re intimidated, don’t want get into trouble, or lose their jobs, will often act without question, making the money transfer as instructed. Unfortunately, once the scam has been uncovered, the money and the fraudster are generally long gone.  Though the details vary with these types of scams, what remains constant is that the lower-level employee does not question the instructions because they believe the instructions are coming straight from their boss. They believe that disobeying the sender of the email can lead to a reprimand or other negative consequences so they act without question. Even though some of these fraudsters have been caught, most of the time they take their winnings and simply vanish.

In addition to raising general public awareness of this type of fraud, forensic accountants can also provide services to help deter and detect executive impersonation fraud. System controls can be instituted and adjusted with this risk in mind.  Possible areas of focus are:

  • Both executives and staff should receive training regarding the features of the email they use, so they can be mindful of what links and attachments they open. One way the fraudsters gain access to executive accounts is by hacking systems using malware that they attach to an email. Since the client’s higher level executives are the ones targeted, you should emphasize the importance of their participation in this training. Accounting and finance staff should be special targets of this training upon hire and should receive regularly scheduled refreshers.
  • Employee training and payment policies should emphasize that, regardless of who is asking, the proper procedures must be kept in place. Even if the CEO is asking for this urgent transfer, the employee must get the required authorizations and verify that the payment is going to a valid vendor. Employers should be encouraged to question authority if a transaction appears out of ordinary; it is the responsibility of management to assure employees that there will never be reprisals for asking questions about any unusual payment; management should initiate formal channels for the asking of such questions.
  • A company should have a social media policy and social media training for employees so prevent employees from inadvertently sharing sensitive company information that would be helpful to hackers.
  • There should be systems in place that, similar to check payments, wire transfers cannot be released by an employee without prior authorization – and never original authorization in the form of an unsupported email from an executive, no matter at what level. Often the controls over check payments are not as rigorous as those for wire transfers. I met a controller at a not for profit organization. During a conversation, he told me how, even though he is not an authorized check signer (because he performs the bank reconciliations) the bank added him to a list of those authorized to initiate wire transfers.
  • There should be a system to verify and confirm wire information for every vendor and any procedural changes should be checked with the company, either by getting in direct touch with the vendor or using the information that the company already has on file.

Forensic accountants are perfectly placed to help clients deter, prevent and detect executive impersonation fraud through strengthening control systems, employee training (including for executives) and maintaining public awareness of this ever more common type of fraud. Electronic communications and on-line banking services can be very convenient and fast but, taking the time to check where instructions are coming from and to what they relate as well as making sure that all such transactions are fully and properly authorized can go a long way to saving a company from the massive headaches consequent on fraud related losses.

The last thing any executive wants is to come back from a fishing trip (that she posted about beforehand in detail on social media), to find that the corporate bank account has been cleaned out by a lower level employee intimidated into acting on the vacationing executive’s alleged say so.