Tag Archives: anti-fraud program

Bribery & Deferred Prosecution

Between January and February 2015, a prominent trade organization focusing on American attorneys conducted a survey of 243 Chief Legal Officers of global companies to assess the corporate counsel’s opinion regarding the greatest threats to their organization’s growth. Respondents were asked to rank their top three concerns. Not surprisingly, economic uncertainty was at the top of the list with 57% of the respondents ranking it in their top three. The unexpected finding was that 53% of the respondents named regulatory compliance and enforcement as a top concern as well.

When asked to specify which laws caused them the most concern 28% identified the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and 15% identified the UK Bribery Act. This means 43% of the respondents named anti-bribery laws as one of their top three concerns, more than any other law or regulation identified. When asked about the resources spent on regulatory compliance and enforcement, the response was also surprising as only 38% of the corporate counsel who identified regulatory compliance and enforcement as a threat, are expending resources to address the threat. As a follow up to the 2015 survey, the same organization conducted a second survey in early 2017 to gain further insight into corporate counsels’ ability to address regulatory and compliance threats. This time 256 respondents were surveyed, 62% of whom stated that their organization is designing or building some type of robust internal compliance program. Although this is movement in the right direction, over a third of the organizations surveyed still may not be prepared to detect or deter bribery and corruption. Most significantly, they will not be prepared to meet government expectations if a violation occurs and self-reporting is required. Lastly, 54% of the respondents stated that they are building or expanding their in-house systems to address this threat. Many believe that compliance technology is the appropriate answer as regulators prefer technical solutions to these problems, because they are viewed to be sophisticated and ‘state of the art’.

This research should be of special interest to all CFEs because we work so frequently with corporate counsels, but indeed, to assurance professionals in general who like fraud examiners are on the front line in the fight against corruption.

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) was enacted in 1977 but aggressive enforcement did not really pick up until around 2005 when there were twelve enforcement actions.  The purpose of the FCPA was to prevent the bribery of foreign government officials when negotiating overseas contracts. The FCPA imposes heavy fines and penalties for both organizations and individuals. The two major provisions address: 1) bribery violations and 2) improper books and records and/or having inadequate internal controls. Methods of enforcement and interpretation of the law in the US have continued to evolve over the years.

The FCPA created questions of definition and interpretation, i.e., Who is a “foreign official?” What is the difference between a “facilitation” payment and a bribe? Who is considered a third party? How does the government define adequate internal controls to detect and deter bribery and corruption?

The enactment of the United Kingdom (UK) Bribery Act in July 2010 was the first attempt at an anti-bribery law to address some of these issues. The UK Bribery Act introduced the concept of adequate procedures, that if followed could allow affirmative defense for an organization if investigated for bribery. The UK Bribery Act recommended several internal controls for combating bribery and introduced the incentive of a more favorable result for those who could document compliance. These controls include:

• Established anti-bribery procedures
• Top level commitment to prevent bribery
• Periodic and documented risk assessments
• Proportionate due diligence
• Communication of bribery prevention policies and procedures
• Monitoring of anti-bribery procedures

The concept of an affirmative defense for adequate procedures creates quite a contrast to FCPA which only offers affirmative defense for payments of bona fide expenses or small gifts within the legal limits of the foreign countries involved.

The UK Bribery Act equated all facilitation and influence payments to bribery. Finally, the UK Bribery Act dealt with the problem of defining a foreign official by making it illegal to bribe anyone regardless of government affiliation. Several countries such as Russia, Canada and Brazil have enacted or updated their anti-bribery regulations to parallel the guidelines presented in the UK Bribery Act. The key to the effectiveness of all these acts remains enforcement.

In November 2012 the US Department of Justice and the Securities Exchange Commission released “A Resource Guide to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.” The guide book introduced several hallmarks of an effective compliance program. The Resource Guide provided companies with the tools to demonstrate a proactive approach to deter bribery and corruption. Companies in compliance may receive some consideration during the fines and penalty stage.

The guide’s hallmarks include:

• Establish a code of conduct that specifically addresses the risk of bribery and corruption.
• Set the tone by designating a Chief Compliance Officer to oversee all anti-bribery and corruption activities.
• Training all employees to be thoroughly prepared to address bribery and corruption risk.
• Perform risk assessments of potential bribery and corruption pitfalls by geography and industry.
• Review the anti-corruption program annually to assess the effectiveness of policies procedures and controls.
• Perform audits and monitor foreign business operations to assure compliance with the code of conduct.
• Ensure that proper legal contractual terms exist within agreements with third parties that address compliance with anti-bribery and corruption laws and regulations.
• Investigate and respond appropriately to all allegations of bribery and corruption.
• Take proper disciplinary action for violations of anti-bribery and corruption laws and regulations.
• Perform adequate due diligence that addresses the risk of bribery and corruption of all third parties prior to entering a business relationship.

The SEC and DOJ entered into the first ever Non-Prosecution Agreement (NPA) for Foreign Corrupt Practices violations in 2013. This decision was a harbinger from the DOJ and SEC with regard to future enforcement actions. The NPA highlighted the “extensive remedial measurements and cooperation efforts” that the defendant company demonstrated during the investigation. The corporation paid only $882,000 in fines because they were able to “demonstrate a strong tone from the top and a robust anti-corruption program”.

Under a Deferred Prosecution Agreement (DPA) the DOJ files a court document charging the organization while simultaneously requesting that prosecution be deferred to allow the company to demonstrate good conduct going forward. The DPA is an agreement by the organization to: cooperate with the government, accept the factual findings of the investigation, and admit culpability if so warranted. Additionally, companies may be directed to participate in compliance and remediation efforts, e.g., a court-appointed monitor.

If the company completes the term of the DPA, the DOJ will dismiss the charges without imposing fines and penalties. Under the Non-Prosecution Agreement, the DOJ maintains the right to file charges against the organization later should the organization fail to comply. The NPA is not filed with the courts but is maintained by both the DOJ and the company and is posted on the DOJ website. Like the DPA, the organization agrees to monetary penalties, ongoing cooperation, admission to relevant facts, as well as compliance and remediation of policies, procedures and controls. If the company complies with the agreement, the DOJ will drop all charges.

The key differences between a deferred prosecution case and one not featuring deferred prosecution is the initial response of the defendant company to the discovery of improper payments. In a deferred prosecution case the response usually features prompt self-reporting, full cooperation with the government and the quality of the serious remedial steps taken, including termination of implicated personnel and the modification of company behavior in the country where the violations occurred. Additionally, deferred prosecution defendants frequently discover the improper payments while in the process of enhancing their anti-bribery and corruption controls.

Originally allegations of FCPA violations were received through a company’s internal whistleblower hotline. That trend changed with the enactment of the Sarbanes Oxley Act in 2002 and the Dodd-Frank Act in 2012. These laws created other means and mechanisms for reporting suspicions of illegal activity and provided protections from retaliation against whistleblowers. The Dodd-Frank Act also has monetary incentives of 10% to 30% of the amounts recovered by the government to encourage whistleblowers to come forward. Companies considering whether to disclose potential anti-corruption problems to the SEC must now consider the possibility that a potential whistleblower may report it first to the government thus creating greater liability for the organization.

In conclusion, according to recent reporting by the ACFE, corporate compliance programs continue to mature, and are now accepted as a cost of conducting business in a global marketplace. The US government continues to clarify its expectations about corporate responsibility at home and abroad and works with international partners and their compliance programs. Increased cooperation between the public and private sectors to address these issues will assist in leveling the playing field in the global marketplace. Non-government and civil society organizations, i.e. World Bank and Transparency International play a key role in this effort. These organizations set standards, apply pressure on foreign governments to enact stricter anti-bribery and corruption laws, and enforce those laws. Coordination and cooperation among government, business and civil entities like the ACFE, reduce the incidences of bribery and corruption and increase opportunities for companies to compete fairly and ethically in the global marketplace.

A Blueprint for Fraud Risk Assessment

It appears that several of our Chapter members have been requested these last few months to assist their employers in conducting several types of fraud risk assessments. They usually do so as the Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE) member of their employing company’s internal audit-lead assessment team.   There is a consensus emerging among anti-fraud experts that conducting a fraud risk assessment (FRA) is critical to the process of detecting, and ultimately designing controls to prevent the ever-evolving types of fraud threatening organizations.

The ACFE tells us that FRAs do not necessarily specify what types of fraud are occurring in an organization. Instead, they are designed to focus detection efforts on specific fraud schemes and scenarios that could occur as well as on incidents that are known to have occurred in the past. Once these are identified, the audit team can proceed with the series of basic and specific fraud detection exercises that broad experience has shown to be effective. The objective of these exercises is to hopefully reveal the specific fraud schemes to which the organization is most exposed. This information will enable the organization’s audit team to recommend to management and to support the implementation of antifraud controls designed to address exactly those risks that have been identified.  It’s important to emphasize that fraud risk assessments are not meant to prevent fraud directly in and of themselves. They are exercises for identifying those specific fraud schemes and scenarios to which an organization is most vulnerable. That information is in turn used to conduct fraud audit exercises to highlight the circumstances that have allowed actual, known past frauds to occur or to blueprint future frauds that could occur so that the necessary controls can be put in place to prevent similar future illegal activity.

In the past, those FRAs that were conducted were usually performed by the firm’s external auditors. Increasingly, however, internal audit departments are being pressured by senior management to conduct FRAs of their own. Since internal audit departments are increasingly employing CFEs or have their expertise available to them through other company departments (like loss prevention or security), this effort can be effective since internal auditors have the tenure and experience with their organizations to know better than anyone how its financial and business operations function and can understand more readily how fraud could occur in particular processes, transactions, and business cycles.

Internal audit employed CFE’s and CIA’s aren’t involved by requirement of their professional standards in daily operations and can, therefore, provide an independent check on their organization’s overall risk management process. Audits can be considered a second channel of information on how well the enterprise’s anti-fraud controls are functioning and whether there are any deficiencies that need to be corrected.  To ensure this channel remains independent, it is important that the audit function report directly to the Audit Committee or to the board of directors and not to the chief executive officer or company president who may have responsibility for her company’s internal controls.

The Institute of Internal Auditors has endorsed audit standards that outline the techniques and procedures for conducting an FRA, specifically those contained in Statement of Auditing Standards 99 (SAS 99). By this (and other) key guidelines, an FRA is meant to assist auditors and/or fraud examiners in adjusting their audit and investigation plans to focus on gathering evidence of potential fraud schemes and scenarios identified by the FRA.

Responding to FRA findings requires the auditor to adjust the timing, nature, and extent of testing in such ways as:

• Performing procedures at physical locations on a surprise or unannounced basis by, for example, counting cash at different subsidiary locations on a surprise basis or reviewing loan portfolios of random loan officers or divisions of a savings and loan on a surprise basis;
• Requesting that financial performance data be evaluated at the end of the reporting period or on a date closer to period-end, in order, for example, to minimize the risk of manipulation of records in the period between the dates of account closings and the end of the reporting period;
• Making oral inquiries of major customers and vendors in addition to sending written confirmations, or sending confirmation requests to a specific party within vendor or customer organization;
• Performing substantive analytical procedures using disaggregated data by, for example, comparing gross profit or operating margins by branch office, type of service, line of business, or month to auditor-developed expectations;
• Interviewing personnel involved in activities in areas where a risk of material misstatement due to fraud has been identified in the past (such as at the country or regional level) to obtain their insights about the risk and how controls could address the risk.

CFE team members can make a substantial contribution to the internal audit lead team effort since it’s essential that financial operations managers and internal audit professionals understand how to conduct an FRA and to thoroughly assess the organization’s exposure to specific frauds. That contribution can add value to management’s eventual formulation and implementation of specific, customized controls designed to mitigate each type of fraud risk identified in the FRA. These are the measures that go beyond the basic, essential control checklists followed by many external auditors; they optimize the organization’s defenses against these risks. As such, they must vary from organization to organization, in accordance with the particular processes and procedures that are identified as vulnerable to fraud.

As an example, company A may process invoices in such a tightly controlled way, with double or triple approvals of new vendors, manual review of all invoices, and so on, that an FRA reveals few if any areas where red flags of vendor fraud can be identified. Company B, on the other hand, may process invoices simply by having the appropriate department head review and approve them. In the latter case, an FRA would raise red flags of potential fraud that could occur through double billing, sham company schemes, or collusion between a dishonest vendor and a company insider. For that reason, SAS 99 indicates that some risks are inherent in the environment of the entity, but most can be addressed with an appropriate system of internal control. Once fraud risk assessment has taken place, the entity can identify the processes, controls, and other procedures that are needed to mitigate the identified risks. Effective internal controls will include a well-developed control environment, an effective and secure information system, and appropriate control and monitoring activities. Because of the importance of information technology in supporting operations and the processing of transactions, management also needs to implement and maintain appropriate controls, whether automated or manual, over computer generated information.

The ACFE tells us that the heart of an effective internal controls system and the effectiveness of an anti-fraud program are contingent on an effective risk management assessment.  Although conducting an FRA is not terribly difficult, it does require careful planning and methodical execution. The structure and culture of the organization dictate how the FRA is formulated. In general, however, there is a basic, generally accepted form of the FRA that the audit and fraud prevention communities have agreed on and about which every experienced CFE is expected to be knowledgeable. Assessing the likelihood and significance of each potential fraud risk is a subjective process that should consider not only monetary significance, but also significance to an organization’s reputation and its legal and regulatory compliance requirements. An initial assessment of fraud risk should consider the inherent risk of a particular fraud in the absence of any known controls that may address the risk. An organization can cost-effectively manage its fraud risks by assessing the likelihood and significance of fraudulent behavior.

The FRA team should include a senior internal auditor (or the chief internal auditor, if feasible) and/or an experienced inside or outside certified fraud examiner with substantial experience in conducting FRAs for organizations in the company’s industry.  The management of the internal audit department should prepare a plan for all the assignments to be performed. The audit plan includes the timing and frequency of planned internal audit work. This audit plan is based on a methodical control risk assessment A control risk assessment documents the internal auditor’s understanding of the institution’s significant activities and their associated risks. The management of the internal audit department should establish the principles of the risk assessment methodology in writing and regularly update them to reflect changes to the system of internal control or work process, and to incorporate new lines of business. The risk analysis examines all the entity’s activities, and the complete internal control system. Based on the results of the risk analysis, an audit plan for several years is established, considering the degree of risk inherent in the activities. The plan also considers expected developments and innovations, the generally higher degree of risk of new activities, and the intention to audit all significant activities and entities within a reasonable time period (audit cycle principle for example, three
years). All those concerns will determine the extent, nature and frequency of the assignments to be performed.

In summary…

• A fraud risk assessment is an analysis of an organization’s risks of being victimized by specific types of fraud;
• Approaches to FRAs will differ from organization to organization, but most FRAs focus on identifying fraud risks in six key categories:
— Fraudulent financial reporting;
— Misappropriation of assets;
— Expenditures and liabilities for an improper purpose;
— Revenue and assets obtained by fraud;
— Costs and expenses avoided by fraud;
— Financial misconduct by senior management.
• A properly conducted FRA guides auditors in adjusting their audit plans and testing to focus specifically on gathering evidence of possible fraud;
• The capability to conduct an FRA is essential to effective assessment of the viability of existing anti-fraud controls and to strengthen the organization’s inadequate controls, as identified by the results of the FRA;
• In addition to assessing the types of fraud for which the organization is at risk, the FRA assesses the likelihood that each of those frauds might occur;
• After the FRA and subsequent fraud auditing work is completed, the FRA team should have a good idea of the specific controls needed to minimize the organization’s vulnerability to fraud;
• Auditing for fraud is a critical next step after assessing fraud risks, and this requires auditing for evidence of frauds that may exist according to the red flags identified by the FRA.

An Ethical Toolbox

As CFE’s we know organizations that have clearly articulated values and a strong culture of ethical behavior tend to control fraud more effectively. They usually have well-established frameworks, principles, rules, standards, and policies that encompass the attributes of generally accepted fraud control. These attributes include leadership, an ethical framework, responsibility structures, a fraud control policy; prevention systems, fraud awareness, third-party management systems, notification systems, detection systems, and investigation systems.

CFE’s are increasingly being called upon to assist in the planning for an assessment of a client organization’s integrity and ethics safeguards and then as active members of the team performing the engagement. The increasing demand for such assessments has grown out of the increasing awareness that a strong ethical culture is a vital part of effective fraud prevention.  Conducting such targeted research within the client organization, within its industry; and its region will help determine the emerging risk areas and potential gaps in most organizational anti-fraud safeguards. Four key elements of integrity and ethics safeguards have emerged over the past few years.  These are the fraud control plan, handling conflicts of interest, shaping ethical dealings with third parties, and natural justice principles for employees facing allegations of wrongdoing.

The need for a fraud control plan is borne out by an organization’s potential fraud losses; typically, about five percent of revenues are lost to fraud each year, according to the ACFE’s 2016 Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse. A fraud control plan typically will articulate an organization’s fraud risks, controls, and mitigation strategies, including:

–Significant business activities;
–Potential areas of fraud risk;
–Related fraud controls;
–Gaps in control coverage and assurance activities;
–Defined remedial actions to minimize fraud risks;
–Review mechanisms evaluating the effectiveness of fraud control strategies.

Management should review and update the fraud control plan periodically and report the results to the audit committee and senior management. Thus, the role of the board and of the audit committee of the board are vital for the implementation of any ethically based fraud control plan. The chairman of the board is, or should be, the chief advocate for the shareholders, and completely independent of management. It is the chairman’s primary job to direct the company’s executives and drive oversight of their activities in the name of the shareholders. An independent and highly skilled audit committee chairman is essential to maintain a robust system of checks and balances over all operations. To be truly effective, the chairman must be independent of those he or she is charged with watching.  The chairmen of the board and the audit committee must devote material time to their duties. While the board can use the company’s oversight functions to maintain a checks and balances process, there is no substitute for personal, direct involvement. The board must be willing to direct inquiries into allegations of misconduct, and have unquestioned confidential spending authority to conduct reviews and investigations as it deems necessary.

One of the most effective compliance tools available to the board is the day-to-day vigilance of the company’s employees. When an individual employee detects wrongdoing, he or she must have an effective and safe method to report observations, such as a third-party ethics hotline that reports to the chairman of the board and audit committee. All employees must be protected from retribution to avoid any possibility of corrupting the process.

A zero-based budgeting process, requiring that the individual elements of the company’s budget be built from the bottom up, reviewed in detail, and justified, can identify unusual spending in numerous corporate and operating units. This provides an in-depth view of spending as opposed to basing the current year’s spending, in aggregate, on last year’s spending, where irregularities may be buried and overlooked.

In organizations with an internal audit division the overall review would typically be performed by Director of Internal Audit (CAE) whom the CFE and other specialists would support. This review should be integrated into the organization’s wider business planning to ensure synergies exist with other business processes, and should link to the organization-wide risk assessment and to other anti-fraud processes.

The ACFE tells us that there is a growing consensus that managing conflicts of interest is critical to curbing corruption. Reports indicate that unmanaged conflicts of interest continue to cost organizations millions of dollars. To minimize these risks, organizations need a clear and well-understood conflict of interest policy, coupled with practical arrangements to implement and monitor policy requirements. Stated simply, a conflict of interest occurs when the independent judgment of a person is swayed, or might be swayed, from making decisions in the best interest of others who are relying on that judgment. An executive or employee is expected to make judgments in the best interest of the company. A director is legally expected to make judgments in the best interest of the company and of its shareholders, and to do so strategically so that no harm and perhaps some benefit will come to other stakeholders and to the public interest. A professional accountant is expected to make judgments that are in the public interest. Decision makers usually have a priority of duties that they are expected to fulfill, and a conflict of interests confuses and distracts the decision maker from that duty, resulting in harm to those legitimate expectations that are not fulfilled. Sometimes the term apparent conflict of interest is used, but it is a misnomer because it refers to a situation where no conflict of interest exists, although because of lack of information someone other than the decision maker would be justified in concluding (however tentatively) that the decision maker does have one

A special or conflicting interest could include any interest, loyalty, concern, emotion, or other feature of a situation tending to make the decision maker’s judgment (in that situation) less reliable than it would normally be, without rendering the decision maker incompetent. Commercial interests and family connections are the most common sources of conflict of interest, but love, prior statements, gratitude, and other subjective tugs on judgment can also constitute interest in this sense.

The perception of competing interests, impaired judgment, or undue influence also can be a conflict of interest. Good practices for managing conflicts of interest involve both prevention and detection, such as:

–Promoting ethical standards through a documented, explicit conflict of interest policy as well as well-stated values and clear conflicts provisions in the code of ethics;
–Identifying, understanding, and managing conflicts of interest through open and transparent communication to ensure that decision-making is efficient, transparent, and fair, and that everyone is aware of what to do if they suspect a conflict;
–Informing third parties of their responsibilities and the consequences of noncompliance through a statement of business ethics and formal contractual requirements;
–Ensuring transparency through well-established arrangements for declaring and registering gifts and other benefits;
–Ensuring that decisions are made independently, with evidence that staff and contractors routinely declare all actual, potential, and perceived conflicts of interests, involving at-risk areas such as procurement, management of contracts, human resources, decision-making, and governmental policy advice;
–Establishing management, internal controls, and independent oversight to detect breaches of policy and to respond appropriately to noncompliance.

Contemporary business models increasingly involve third parties, with external supplier costs now representing one of the most significant lines of expenditure for many organizations. Such interactions can provide an opportunity for fraud and corruption. An enterprise’s strong commitment to ethical values needs to be communicated to suppliers through a Statement of Business Ethics. Many forward-thinking organizations already have codes of ethics in place that set out the values and ethical expectations of both their board members and staff. The board code of conduct should define the behavioral standards for members, while the staff code of conduct should detail standards for employee conduct and the sanctions that apply for wrongdoing. Similar statements also are appropriate for third parties such as suppliers, service providers, and business partners.

A statement of business ethics outlines both acceptable and unacceptable practices in third-party dealings with an organization. Common features include:

–The CEO’s statement on the organization’s commitment to operating ethically;
–The organization’s values and business principles;
–What third parties can expect in their dealings with the organization and the behaviors expected of them;
–Guidance related to bribery, gifts, benefits, hospitality, travel, and accommodation; conflicts of interest; confidentiality and privacy of information; ethical communications; secondary employment; and other expectations.
–Contact information for concerns, clarification, reporting of wrongdoing, and disputes.

Once established, the organization needs to implement a well-rounded communication strategy for the statement of business ethics that includes education of staff members, distribution to third parties, publication on the organization’s website, references to it in the annual report, and inclusion in future tender proposals and bid packs.

Engaged and capable employees underpin the success of most organizations, yet management does not always recognize the bottom-line effects and employee turnover costs when innocent employees are the subject of allegations of fraud and other wrongdoing. About 60 percent of allegations against employees turn out to be unsubstantiated, according to the ACFE. A charter of rights compiles in a single document all the information that respondents to allegations of wrongdoing may require. Such a charter should be written in an easy-to-understand style to meet the needs of its target audience. It should:

–Outline the charter’s purpose, how it will operate, how it supports a robust complaints and allegations system, and how it aligns with the organization’s values;
–Describe how management handles workplace allegations and complaints, and ensure principles of natural justice and other legislative obligations, such as privacy, are in place;
–Provide a high-level overview diagram of the allegation assessment and investigation process, including the channels for submitting allegations; the distinct phases for logging, assessing, and investigating the allegations; and the final decision-making phase;
–Include details of available support such as contact information for human resource specialists, details about an external confidential employee help line, and processes for updates throughout the investigation;
–Illustrate the tiered escalation process for handling allegations that reflects (at one end) how issues of a serious, sensitive, or significant nature are addressed, and encourages (at the other end) the handling of low level localized issues as close to the source as possible;
–Provide answers to frequent questions that respondents might have about the process for dealing with allegations, such as “What can I expect?” “Are outcomes always reviewable?” “What does frivolous and vexatious mean?” “What will I be told about the outcome?” and “What happens when a process is concluded?”;
–Outline the options for independent reviews of adverse investigation outcomes.