With a Little Help

by Rumbi Petrozzello, CPA/CFF, CFE
2018 Vice-President – Central Virginia Chapter ACFE

In November, my husband and I headed out to our usual spot, on Fourth Avenue in Brooklyn, to cheer for those running the New York marathon. A marathon, for those who don’t know, is 26.2 miles long. People who complete marathons get nothing but respect from me – success in marathoning only comes with a lot of dedication and training. Many people spend at least six months following a training plan that is not just about building distance. For instance, when learning (and it is learning) how to complete 26.2 miles of running (or walking for that matter) people must learn how to remain fueled and hydrated while running. This training also then applies to making lifestyle adjustments such as changing one’s diet and sleeping habits. Years ago, when I was training for the New York Marathon, friends knew to not call after 10PM because I was going to bed early to get enough sleep before early morning runs. I tried not to go out on Friday nights, because I went on my long runs on Saturday mornings and wanted to be energized for them. I spent a lot of time and energy doing research, talking to friends who were seasoned runners and even took running classes to improve my performance and chances of success during the race. Despite the very popular tag line “Just Do It”, a lot of work goes into even getting to that point.

The past few months, I have been doing quite a bit of work that involves assessing the controls that companies have over their systems to detect, deter and prevent fraud and error. Going in, the time energy and money that companies have put into all of this is impressive. They will have an audit committee, an internal audit function and a lot of documentation around what their systems are. There will be volumes of documentation on procedures and protocols and, at the very least, on paper, things look fantastic. However, when we start talking to employees about what their reality is, things often are very different. Some of the issues we found included:

• Staff who did not quite understand what some technical terms meant and, so ignored the parts they didn’t understand. We spoke with people who were very happy to perform and review controls, but they didn’t know how best to do that, and no one was telling them the how;

• Some staff did not understand why they were being asked to change things and, believing that what they had been doing for years constituted a good system, stuck with that;

• In some cases, it wasn’t clear just who was responsible for ownership of a process and that meant, often, that nothing ended up getting done;

• In other instances, staff were given such vague instructions that they resorted to making it up as they went along.

Having the rules is completely useless if your people don’t know what do with them and, just as importantly, why they’re doing what they’ve been asked to do in the first place. What is vital in all of this, is the proper training. As CFEs and Forensic Accountants, we are perfectly positioned to work with clients to ensure that controls and systems go beyond theory. So it’s vitally important for success to constantly work with clients to strengthen systems and controls. This can be done by recommending that our corporate clients:

• Provide training to employees. This training must include the identification of control owners and then the process of working directly with them to ensure that they understand what their roles are and specifically why they need to follow the steps being asked of them. Sometimes, when a control owner is given a requested role, they are told to “review” something. Review can mean anything and often what some people consider to be a review is insufficient for complete understanding. For instance, an employee may think that merely saying they checked something is sufficient. Or that having a verbal conversation is enough proof of review. Be sure to recommend to clients that they let employees know that there should be written evidence of a mandated review and to be equally sure to provide clear examples of what qualifies as evidence of that review.

• Review systems and controls to ensure that they address risks. A company may institute many systems and related procedures but, upon review, a CFE or forensic accountant may find inadequate segregation of duties. You may find that a supervisor is checking a team’s work, but no one is authorizing that supervisor’s. This becomes particularly risky if that supervisor has access to many aspects of the business. A CFE or forensic accountant, can review roles and duties to ensure that duties are sufficiently segregated.

• Training should be ongoing and updated for changes in the company as well as changes in technology and processes. At least once a year, employees should receive updated training and performance reviews. In this way, companies can also learn if there have been material changes that might lead to systems and processes having been adjusted in such a way as to create weakness and holes that could lead to future fraud or error.

It’s all well and good to have ads where famous people run, jump and play and tell you to “just do it”. I remember people rolling their eyes at me when I mentioned that I was dashing to running class – why do you have to learn how to run? Doesn’t everyone know how to do that? Yes, I could run, but with training, I ran a better marathon and lived to tell the tale (unlike the original guy). Yes, employees may know how to do the compliance and control work but as a CFE or forensic accountant, you can help a client company work with their employees to perform their work better, be aware of controls and be cognizant of risk and how to mitigate it. It’s so much better than just doing it.

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