Internal Auditors as Fraud Auditors

Although fraud prevention is always more effective and less costly than fraud detection (and subsequent investigation), unfortunately prevention is not always possible. That’s why, as CFE’s and forensic accountants we should all be heavy promoters (and supporters) of client internal audit functions.  That is also why we should make it a goal that all employees of our client companies be trained in how to identify the major red flags of fraud they may encounter in their daily activities. Mastering key detection techniques is doubly essential for the internal audit and financial professionals employed by those same enterprises. Our Chapter has long preached that once internal auditors and financial managers know what to look for, there is an enhanced chance that fraud or suspicious activity will be detected one way or another, but only if the organization has the proper monitoring, reporting, and auditing procedures in place.

With that said, many organizations require internal audits of specific business processes and units only once every two or three years. In an age when so much can change so quickly in an internet dominated world, this approach is not the most effective insofar as fraud detection and prevention are concerned. This is especially so because conventional audits were most often not designed to detect fraud in the first place, usually focusing on specified groups of internal controls or compliance with existing policies, laws and regulations. That’s why the ACFE and Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) now recommend that a fraud risk assessment (FRA) be conducted annually and that the fraud-auditing procedures designed to detect red flags in the high-risk areas identified by the FRA be incorporated into internal audit plans immediately.

There is often a fine line between detection and prevention. In fact, some detection steps overlap with prevention methods, as in the case of conflict of interest, where enforcing a management financial disclosure policy may both detect conflicting financial interests and prevent frauds resulting from them by virtue of the actual detection of the relationships. In most organizations, however, carefully assessing the description of prevention and detection controls demonstrates that there is usually a clear distinction between the two.

The IIA tell us that the internal audit function is a critical element in assessing the effectiveness of an institution’s internal control system. The internal audit consists of procedures to prevent or identify significant inaccurate, incomplete, or unauthorized transactions; deficiencies in safeguarding assets; unreliable financial reporting; and deviations from laws, regulations, and institutional policies. When properly designed and implemented, internal audits provide directors and senior management with timely information about weaknesses in the internal control system, facilitating prompt remedial action. Each institution should have an internal audit function appropriate to its size and the nature and scope of its activities.

This is a complex way of saying that our client’s internal audit function should focus on monitoring the institution’s internal controls, which, although not mentioned explicitly, include controls specifically designed to prevent fraud.  To effectively assess anti-fraud controls, auditors first must exercise detection techniques and procedures that confirm the existence of red flags or actual evidence of potential fraud in the risk areas identified by the FRA.

The Chief Internal Auditor is typically responsible for the following:

–Performing, or contracting for, a control risk assessment documenting the internal auditor’s understanding of significant business activities and associated risks. These assessments typically analyze the risks inherent in each business line, the mitigating control processes, and the resulting residual risk exposure;

–An internal audit plan responsive to results of the control risk assessment. This plan typically specifies key internal control summaries within each business activity, the timing and frequency of internal audit work, and the resource budget;

–An internal audit program that describes audit objectives and specifies procedures performed during each internal audit review;

–An audit report presenting the purpose, scope, and results of each audit. Work papers should be maintained to document the work performed and support audit findings.

There is a joint ACFE-IIA-AICPA document with which every CFE should be familiar.  ‘The Business Risk of Fraud’ provides clarity about the internal auditor’s role in detecting fraud in our client organization’s operations and financial statements. Specifically, the document states that internal auditors should consider the organization’s assessment of fraud risk when developing their annual audit plan and periodically assess management’s fraud detection capabilities. They should also interview and regularly communicate with those conducting the assessments, as well as with others in key positions throughout the company, to help them assess whether all fraud risks have been considered. Moreover, according to the document, when performing audits, internal auditors should devote sufficient time and attention to evaluating the “design and operation” of internal controls related to preventing and detecting significant fraud risks. They should exercise professional skepticism when reviewing activities to be on guard for the signs of potential fraud. Potential frauds uncovered during an engagement should be treated in accordance with a well-defined response plan consistent with professional and legal standards.

Among the most helpful guides for CFEs to recommend to clients for their internal auditors use in planning a detailed audit to detect fraud is the all-important SAS 99 which contains key fraud detection techniques including guidance on the performance of certain financial ratio analysis. Analytical procedures performed during planning may be helpful in identifying the risks of material misstatement due to fraud. However, because such analytical procedures generally use data aggregated at a high level, the results of those analytical procedures provide only a broad initial indication about whether a material misstatement of the financial statements may exist. Accordingly, the results of analytical procedures performed during planning should be considered along with other information gathered by the auditor in identifying the risks of material misstatement due to fraud.

SAS 99 was formulated with the aim of detecting fraud that has a direct impact on “material misstatement.” Essentially this means that anything in the organization’s financial activities that could result in fraud-related misstatements in its financial records should be audited for by using SAS 99 as a guide. SAS 99 breaks down the potential fraudulent causes of material misstatement into two categories:

1. Misstatement due to fraudulent financial reporting (i.e., “book cooking”);

2. Misstatement due to misappropriation of assets (i.e., theft).

The fraud auditing procedures of SAS 99, or of any other reputable audit guidance, can greatly assist internal auditors in distinguishing between actual fraud and error. Often the two have similar characteristics, with the key difference being that of the existence or absence of intent. Toward this end, SAS 99 and other key fraud auditing guidelines provide detailed procedures for gathering evidence of potential fraud based on the lists of fraud risks resulting from the client’s FRA. As SAS 99 states:

‘SAS 99. . . strongly recommend[s] direct involvement by internal auditors in the organization’s fraud-auditing efforts: Internal auditors may conduct proactive auditing to search for corruption, misappropriation of assets, and financial statement fraud. This may include the use of computer-assisted audit techniques to detect types of fraud. Internal auditors also can employ analytical and other procedures to isolate anomalies and perform detailed reviews of high-risk accounts and transactions to identify potential financial statement fraud. The internal auditors should have an independent reporting line directly to the audit committee, enabling them to express any concerns about management’s commitment to appropriate internal controls or to report suspicions or allegations of fraud involving senior management.

Specifically, SAS 99 provides a set of audit responses designed to gather hard evidence of potential fraud that could exist based on what the client organization learned from its FRA. These responses are critical to the auditor’s success in identifying clear red flags of potential fraud in our client’s operations. The responses are wide ranging and include anything from the application of appropriate ratio analytics, to thorough and detailed testing of controls governing specific business process procedures, to the analysis of anomalies in vendor or customer account activity. There are three broad categories into which such detailed internal audit fraud auditing responses fall:

1. The nature of auditing procedures performed may need to be changed to obtain evidence that is more reliable or to obtain additional corroborative information;
2. The timing of substantive tests may need to be modified. The auditor might conclude that substantive testing should be performed at or near the end of the reporting period to best address an identified risk of material misstatement due to fraud;
3. The extent of the procedures applied should reflect the assessment of the risks of material misstatement due to fraud. For example, increasing sample sizes or performing analytical procedures at a more detailed level may be appropriate.

The contribution of a fully staffed and management-supported internal audit function to a subsequent CFE conducted fraud examination can be extraordinary and its value never overstated; no client fraud prevention and detection program should ever be considered complete without one.

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