Category Archives: Business Continuity

Managing Disruption

Technology risks are evolving and changing so rapidly, it’s more difficult for management to assess new fraud threats and to adjust its strategies to manage and mitigate them. Applications that use disruptive technologies, such as artificial intelligence, advanced robotics, 3D printing, blockchain, and the Internet of Things, are being designed quickly and often generate new high-growth markets. CFEs and other anti-fraud professionals are struggling to stay abreast of the most recent developments and to identify anti-fraud policies, procedures and controls that add value.  Additionally, the exponential growth of computing power has enabled our client organizations to capitalize on the use of mobile devices and to leverage the ubiquity of the internet to reach their markets almost instantly.

While this is an exciting and challenging opportunity for marketers and business managers, it has injected new risk considerations for CFEs. Digitalization of data has created opportunities for knowledgeable investigators to improve their use of data analytics, use algorithms to facilitate cognitive intelligence, and to even create bot applications that perform automated fraud assessment tasks in real time. The essence of the risks and controls involved has not changed as much as the underlying technology. The new processes still need to adhere to organizational policies and procedures, change management practices are still a vital component in transitioning to new tools and processes, and system and access controls must continue to be enforced. However, some controls that were important in the past now take on a new level of criticality. Automated algorithms result in less transparency of the underlying process. When data is used and shared through these processes, accuracy and completeness become a necessity. An organization needs very specific controls to ensure a bot does not proliferate erroneous data. Anti-fraud focused information security and access control processes must treat the bot as if it were a person and only allow it access to appropriate data. Checks and balances must be integrated into the process to ensure the results are accurate, service level agreements are met, and contracts remain faithfully performed.

Advanced materials, 3D printing, and autonomous vehicles are other advances that are transforming the fraud prevention landscape. New businesses created by these technologies need to follow established governance processes and design fraud and abuse risk management and related internal controls into their business processes. As entirely new markets and products are developed, it’s important that risk managers with fraud investigation experience are involved proactively from the first. This blog has devoted several recent posts to blockchain technology.  Blockchain is a distributed ledger that maintains a shared list of records. Each of these records contains time-stamped data that is encoded and linked to every other previous transaction in that chain of transactions. The decentralized and distributed storage of these records provides visibility to everyone in the network and ensures that no single entity can change any of the historical records. While blockchain is already being used in numerous applications, most notably digital currencies, many other industries are exploring the technology.  Banks are testing cross-border financial transactions, and there is much speculation about the potential to use blockchain to eliminate the middle man in real estate deals, routine contract management, stock purchases, and other similar transactions. If blockchain is effective at eliminating intermediaries, the new business model will expose all the transacting parties to new fraud risks, which were previously being addressed by the middle man.

There are several ways CFEs can proactively help manage the effect of the fraud related aspects of disruptive technologies on their client organizations. By focusing on anti-fraud assurance, providing fraud scenario insight to management, and by demonstrating proficiency and expertise in innovative technologies, fraud examiners will be able to contribute significantly to the overall fraud prevention programs of our client organizations.

For many years organizations have been encouraged by economists to focus on what they do best. That is wise advice for the fraud examination profession, as well. By continuing to focus on governance, fraud risk, and preventative controls, CFEs can help ensure fraud prevention policies and processes are designed and operating effectively. Regardless of the nature or tempo of the changes, investigators will then be able to more effectively fulfill their mission. Moreover, proactively helping their organizations anticipate emerging fraud risks and technological changes can position fraud examiners as authorities and better prepare client organizations to better respond to disruptive events.

By aligning with the expectations of the profession’s key client stakeholders and working closely with those subject-matter experts who are implementing disruptive technologies from within and without, CFEs can remain focused on the most relevant and significant fraud prevention related issues.  For example, cybersecurity and data privacy are topics that every organization is managing. Identifying trends that will affect the organization, and collaborating with and providing insight to their stakeholders, can enable the CFE community to significantly affect the business agenda.  More than ever, fraud examiners must constantly pursue training to learn about recent technologies and the complex and emerging new risks being introduced into their organizations.  Additionally, chief investigators need to focus on developing an adaptive, flexible, innovative staffing model. This new model must tap into a highly specialized talent pool that has the technological competence to rapidly understand and leverage new tools, techniques, and processes.  Perhaps the most important thing CFEs can do to prepare for disruptive technological innovations is to embrace and leverage new technologies in their own work. CFE investigators need to be at the forefront of adopting artificial intelligence, cognitive computing, and smart robots.

All assurance professionals need to completely understand how technologies like blockchain work and how they can be used and analyzed in fraud investigations.  They must take advantage of machine learning and data analytics in their examination processes. Moreover, continuous fraud auditing should be the standard default for new review routines and real-time identification of fraud signatures and red flags should be a requirement as organizations implement new business processes.

In summary, the threat of disruptive technologies has arrived and will affect every organization regardless of its size or objectives. When Gordon Moore observed in 1965 that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit had doubled every year since transistors were invented, few thought that exponential growth would continue for more than 50 years. As computing power increases, technology becomes more mobile, data becomes more accessible and usable, and fraudsters capitalize on the opportunities that arise. Fraud risk managers will have to assess emerging threats consistently and continuously. CFEs will need to respond to emerging threats with new and better ways to perform our investigations and engage to redesign our own processes or face disruption ourselves.

The Conflicted Board

Our last post about cyberfraud and business continuity elicited a comment about the vital role of corporate governance from an old colleague of mine now retired and living in Seattle.  But the wider question our commenter had was, ‘What are we as CFEs to make of a company whose Board willfully withholds for months information about a cyberfraud which negatively impacts it customers and the public? From the ethical point of view, does this render the Board somehow complicit in the public harm done?’

Governance of shareholder-controlled corporations refers to the oversight, monitoring, and controlling of a company’s activities and personnel to ensure support of the shareholders’ interests, in accordance with laws and the expectations of stakeholders. Governance has been more formally defined by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) as a set of relationships between a company’s management, its Board, its shareholders, and other stakeholders. Corporate governance also provides the structure through which the objectives of the company are set (including about ethical continuity), and the means of attaining those objectives and monitoring performance. Good corporate governance should provide proper incentives for the Board and management to pursue objectives that are in the interests of the company and its shareholders and should facilitate effective monitoring.

The role and mandate of the Board of Directors is of paramount importance in the governance framework. Typically, the directors are elected by the shareholders at their annual meeting, which is held to receive the company’s audited annual financial statements and the audit report thereon, as well as the comments of the chairman of the Board, the senior company officers, and the company auditor.

A Board of Directors often divides itself into subcommittees that concentrate more deeply in specific areas than time would allow the whole Board to pursue. These subcommittees are charged with certain actions and/or reviews on behalf of the whole Board, with the proviso that the whole Board must be briefed on major matters and must vote on major decisions. Usually, at least three subcommittees are created to review matters related to (1) governance, (2) compensation, and (3) audit, and to present their recommendations to the full Board. The Governance Committee deals with codes of conduct and company policy, as well as the allocation of duties among the subcommittees of the Board. The Compensation Committee reviews the performance of senior officers, and makes recommendations on the nature and size of salaries, bonuses, and related remuneration plans. Most important to fraud examiners and assurance professionals, the Audit Committee reviews internal controls and systems that generate financial reports prepared by management; the appropriateness of those financial reports; the effectiveness of the company’s internal and external auditors; its whistle-blowing systems, and their findings; and recommends the re-election or not of the company’s external auditors.

The Board must approve the selection of a Chief Executive Officer (CEO), and many Boards are now approving the appointment of the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) as well because of the important of that position. Generally, the CEO appoints other senior executives, and they, in turn, appoint the executives who report to them. Members of these committees are selected for their expertise, interest, and character, with the expectation that the independent judgment of each director will be exercised in the best interest of the company. For example, the ACFE tells us, members of the Audit Committee must be financially literate, and have sufficient expertise to understand audit and financial matters. They must be of independent mind (i.e., not be part of management or be relying upon management for a significant portion of their annual income), and must be prepared to exercise that independence by voting for the interest of all shareholders, not just those of management or of specific limited shareholder groups.

Several behavioral expectations extend to all directors, i.e., to act in the best interest of the company (shareholders & stakeholders), to demonstrate loyalty by exercising independent judgment, acting in good faith, obedient to the interests of all and to demonstrate due care, diligence, and skill.

All directors are expected to demonstrate certain fiduciary duties. Shareholders are relying on directors to serve shareholders’ interests, not the directors’ own interests, nor those of management or a third party. This means that directors must exercise their own independent judgment in the best interests of the shareholders. The directors must do so in good faith (with true purpose, not deceit) on all occasions. They must exercise appropriate skill, diligence, and an expected level of care in all their actions.

Obviously, there will be times when directors will be able to make significant sums of money by misusing the trust with which they have been bestowed and at the expense of the other stakeholders of the company. At these times a director’s interests may conflict with those of the others. Therefore, care must be taken to ensure that such conflicts are disclosed, and that they are managed so that no harm comes to the other shareholders. For example, if a director has an interest in some property or in a company that is being purchased, s/he should disclose this to the other directors and refrain from voting on the acquisition. These actions should alert other directors to the potential self-dealing of the conflicted director, and thereby avoid the non-conflicted directors from being misled into thinking that the conflicted director was acting only with the corporation’s interests in mind.

From time to time, directors may be sued’ by shareholders or third parties who believe that the directors have failed to live up to appropriate expectations. However, courts will not second-guess reasonable decisions by non-conflicted directors that have been taken prudently and on a reasonably informed basis. This is known as the business judgment ru1e and it protects directors charged with breach of their duty of care if they have acted honestly and reasonably. Even if no breach of legal rights has occurred, shareholders may charge that their interests have been ‘oppressed’ (i.e., prejudiced unfairly, or unfairly disregarded) by a corporation or a director’s actions, and courts may grant what is referred to as an oppression remedy of financial compensation or other sanctions against the corporation or the director personally. If, however, the director has not been self-dealing or misappropriating the company’s opportunities, s/he will likely be protected from personal liability by the business judgment rule.

Some shareholders or third parties have chosen to sue directors ‘personally in tort’ for their conduct as directors, even when they have acted in good faith and within the scope of their duties, and when they believed they were acting in the best interests of the corporations they serve.  Recently, courts have held that directors cannot escape such personal liability by simply claiming that they did the action when performing their corporate responsibilities. Consequently, directors or officers must take care when making all decisions that they meet normal standards of behavior.

Consequently, when management and the Board of a company who has been the victim of a cyber-attack decides to withhold information about the attack (sometimes for weeks or months), fundamental questions about compliance with fiduciary standards and ethical duty toward other stakeholders and the public can quickly emerge.   The impact of recent corporate cyber-attack scandals on the public has the potential to change future governance expectations dramatically. Recognition that some of these situations appear to have resulted from management inattention or neglect (the failure to timely patch known software vulnerabilities, for example) has focused attention on just how well a corporation can expect to remediate its public face and ensure ongoing business continuity following such revelations to the public.

My colleague points out that so damaging were the apparently self-protective actions taken by the Boards of some of these victim companies in the wake of several recent attacks to protect their share price, (thereby shielding the interests of existing executives, directors, and investors in the short term) that the credibility of their entire corporate governance and accountability processes has been jeopardized, thus endangering, in some cases, even their ability to continue as viable going concerns.

In summary, in the United States, the Board of Directors sits at the apex of a company’s governing structure. A typical Board’s duties include reviewing the company’s overall business strategy, selecting and compensating the company’s senior executives; evaluating the company’s outside auditor, overseeing the company’s financial statements; and monitoring overall company performance. According to the Business Roundtable, the Board’s ‘paramount duty’ is to safeguard the interests of the company’s shareholders.  It’s fair to ask if a Board that chooses not to reveal to its stakeholders or to the general investor public a potentially devastating cyber-fraud for many months can be said to have meet either the letter or the spirit of its paramount duty.

Cyberfraud & Business Continuity

We received an e-mail inquiry from a follower of our Chapter’s LinkedIn page last week asking specifically about recovery following a cyberfraud penetration and, in general, about disaster planning for smaller financial institutions. It’s a truism that with virtually every type of business process and customer moving away from brick-and-mortar places of business to cloud supported business transactions and communication, every such organization faces an exponential increase in the threat of viruses, bots, phishing attacks, identity theft, and a whole host of other cyberfraud intrusion risks.  All these threats illustrate why a post-intrusion continuity plan should be at or near the top of any organization’s risk assessment, yet many of our smaller clients especially remain stymied by what they feel are the costs and implementational complexity of developing such a plan. Although management understands that it should have a plan, many say, “we’ll have to get to that next year”, yet it never seems to happen.

Downtime due to unexpected penetrations, breeches and disasters of all kinds not only affect our client businesses individually, but can also affect the local, regional, or worldwide economy if the business is sufficiently large or critical. Organizations like Equifax do not operate in a vacuum; they are held accountable by customers, vendors, and owners to operate as expected. Moreover, the extent of the impact on a business depends on the products or services it offers. Having an updated, comprehensive, and tested general continuity plan can help organizations mitigate operational losses in the event of any disaster or major disruption. Whether it’s advising the organization about cyberfraud in general or reviewing the different elements of a continuity plan for fraud impact, the CFE can proactively assist the client organization on the front end in getting a cyberfraud-recovery continuity plan in place and then in ensuring its efficient operation on the back end.

Specifically, regarding the impact of cyberfraud, the ACFE tells us that, until relatively recently, many organizations reported not having directly addressed it in their formal business continuity plans. Some may have had limited plans that addressed only a few financial fraud-related scenarios, such as employee embezzlement or supplier billing fraud, but hadn’t equipped general employees to deal with even the most elemental impacts of cyberfraud.   However, as these threats increasingly loomed, and as their on-line business expanded, more organizations have committed themselves to the process of formally addressing them.

An overall business continuity plan, including targeted elements to address cyberfraud, isn’t a short-term project, but rather an ongoing set of procedures and control definitions that must evolve along with the organization and its environment. It’s an action plan, complete with the tools and resources needed to continue those critical business processes necessary to keep the entity operating after a cyber disruption. Before advising our clients to embark on such a business continuity plan project, we need to make them aware that there is a wealth of documentation available that they can review to help in their planning and execution effort. An example of such documentation is one written for the industry of our Chapter’s inquirer, banking; the U.S. Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council’s (FFIEC’s) Business Continuity Planning Handbook. And there are other such guides available on-line to orient the continuity process for entities in virtually every other major business sector.  While banks are held to a high standard of preparedness, and are subject to regular bank examination, all types of organizations can profit from use of the detailed outline the FFIEC handbook provides as input to develop their own plans. The publication encourages organizations of all sizes to adopt a process-oriented approach to continuity planning that involves business impact analysis as well as fraud risk assessment, management, and monitoring.

An effective plan begins with client commitment from the top. Senior management and the board of directors are responsible for managing and controlling risk; plan effectiveness depends on management’s willingness to commit to the process from start to finish. Working as part of the implementation team, CFEs can make sure both the audit committee and senior management understand this commitment and realize that business disruption from cyber-attack represents an elevated risk to the organization that merits senior-level attention. The goal of this analysis is to identify the impact of cyber threats and related events on all the client organizations’ business processes. Critical needs are assessed for all functions, processes, and personnel, including specialized equipment requirements, outsourced relationships and dependencies, alternate site needs, staff cross-training, and staff support such as specialized training and guidance from human resources regarding related personnel issues. As participants in this process, CFEs acting proactively are uniquely qualified to assist management in the identification of different cyberfraud threats and their potential impacts on the organization.

Risk assessment helps gauge whether planned cyberfraud-related continuity efforts will be successful. Business processes and impact assumptions should be stress tested during this phase. Risks related to protecting customer and financial information, complying with regulatory guidelines, selecting new systems to support the business, managing vendors, and maintaining secure IT should all be considered. By focusing on a single type of potential cyber threat’s impact on the business, our client organizations can develop realistic scenarios of related threats that may disrupt the cyber-targeted processes.  At the risk assessment stage, organization should perform a gap analysis to compare what actions are needed to recover normal operations versus those required for a major business interruption. This analysis highlights cyber exposures that the organization will need to address in developing its recovery plan. Clients should also consider conducting another gap analysis to compare what is present in their proposed or existing continuity plan with what is outlined (in the case of a bank) in the recommendations presented in the FFIEC handbook. This is an excellent way to assess needs and compliance with these and/or the guidelines available for other industries. Here too, CFEs can provide value by employing their skills in fraud risk assessment to assist the organization in its identification of the most relevant cyber risks.

After analyzing the business impact analysis and risk assessment, the organization should devise a strategy to mitigate the risks of business interruption from cyberfraud. This becomes the plan itself, a catalog of steps and checklists, which includes team members and their roles for recovery, to initiate action following a cyber penetration event. The plan should go beyond technical issues to also include processes such as identifying a lead team, creating lists of emergency contacts, developing calling trees, listing manual procedures, considering alternate locations, and outlining procedures for dealing with public relations.  As members of the team CFEs, can work with management throughout response plan creation and installation, consulting on plan creation, while advising management on areas to consider and ensuring that fraud related risks are transparently defined and addressed.

Testing is critical to confirm cyber fraud contingency plans. Testing objectives should start small, with methods such as walkthroughs, and increase to eventually encompass tabletop exercises and full enterprise wide testing. The plan should be reviewed and updated for any changes in personnel, policies, operations, and technology. CFEs can provide management with a fraud-aware review of the plan and how it operates, but their involvement should not replace management’s participation in testing the actual plan. If the staff who may have to execute the plan have never touched it, they are setting themselves up for failure.

Once the plan is created and tested, maintaining it becomes the most challenging activity and is vital to success in today’s ever-evolving universe of cyber threats. Therefore, concurrent updating of the plan in the face of new and emerging threats is critical.

In summary, cyberfraud-threat continuity planning is an ongoing process for all types of internet dependent organizations that must remain flexible as daily threats change and migrate. The plan is a “living” document. The IT departments of organizations are challenged with identifying and including the necessary elements unique to their processes and environment on a continuous basis. Equally important, client management must oversee update of the plan on a concurrent basis as the business grows and introduces new on-line dependent products and services. CFEs can assist by ensuring that their client organizations keep cyberfraud related continuity planning at the top of mind by conducting periodic reviews of the basic plan and by reporting on the effectiveness of its testing.