Category Archives: Post Fraud Planning

First Steps to Prosecution

A recent study sponsored by the financial trade press indicated some haziness among assurance professionals generally about the precise mechanism(s) underlying the process by which the authorities make the initial decision to prosecute or not to prosecute alleged financial statement fraud.

In the U.S. federal system, a criminal investigation of fraudulent financial reporting can originate in all sorts of ways. An investigation may be initiated because of a whistleblower, an anonymous tip, information supplied by a conscientious or guilt-ridden employee, or facts discovered during a routine annual audit of the company’s financial statements. In addition, the company’s public disclosure of financial misstatements may itself lead to the commencement of a criminal investigation. However initially initiated, the decision to start a criminal investigation is entirely within the discretion of the United States Attorney in each federal district.

For the prosecutor, the decision whether to open an investigation can be difficult. The main reason is the need for the prosecutor to establish criminal intent, that is, that the perpetrator not only got the accounting wrong but did so willfully. Often, bad accounting will be the result of judgment calls, which can be defended as exactly that, executive determinations or judgement calls that, while easy to second guess with the benefit of hindsight, were made in good faith at the time. Thus, a prosecutor evaluating the viability of a criminal prosecution will be looking for evidence of conduct so egregious that the perpetrator must have known it was wrong. This is not to suggest that evidence of a wrongful intent is the only consideration. A prosecutor’s exercise of his or her prosecutorial discretion may consider all kinds of factors in deciding whether criminal inquiry is warranted. Those factors may include the magnitude and nature of the accounting misstatements, whether individuals personally benefited from the misstatements or acted pursuant to the directive of a superior, whether documents were fabricated or destroyed, the probable deterrent or rehabilitative effect of prosecution, and the likelihood of success at trial. The availability of governmental resources may also be a factor.

Where the putative defendant is a corporation, partnership, or other business organization, a more settled set of factors come into play:

–The nature and seriousness of the offense, including the risk of harm to the public, and applicable policies and priorities, if any, governing the prosecution of corporations for certain categories of crime;
–The pervasiveness of wrongdoing within the corporation, including the complicity in, or the condoning of, the wrongdoing by corporate management;
–The corporation’s history of similar misconduct, including prior criminal, civil, and regulatory enforcement actions against it;
–The corporation’s timely and voluntary disclosure of wrong-doing and its willingness to cooperate in the investigation of its agents;
–The existence and effectiveness of the corporation’s preexisting compliance program;
–The corporation’s remedial actions, including any efforts to implement an effective corporate compliance program or to improve an existing one, to replace responsible management, to discipline or terminate wrongdoers, to pay restitution, and to cooperate with the relevant government agencies;
–Collateral consequences, including whether there is disproportionate harm to shareholders, pension holders, employees, and others not proven personally culpable, as well as the impact on the public arising from the prosecution;
–The adequacy of the prosecution of individuals responsible for the corporation’s malfeasance;
–The adequacy of remedies such as civil or regulatory enforcement actions.

However, a prosecutor gets there, once s/he determines to commence a criminal investigation, there is no doubt that those who are its targets will quickly come to view it as a priority over everything else. The government’s powers to investigate are broad, and, once a determination to go forward is made, the full resources of the government, including the FBI, can be brought to bear. The criminal sentences resulting from a successful prosecution can be severe if not excessive, particularly considering the enhanced criminal sentences put in place by Sarbanes-Oxley.  The ACFE reports that one midlevel executive at a company who elected to proceed to trial was convicted and received a prison sentence of 24 years. The fact that the sentence was subsequently set aside on appeal does little to mitigate the concern that such a sentence could be imposed upon a first-time, nonviolent offender whose transgression was a failure to apply generally accepted accounting principles.

Typically, a company learns that it is involved in a criminal investigation when it receives a grand jury subpoena, in most instances a subpoena duces tecum, compelling the company or its employees to furnish documents to the grand jury. In an investigation of fraudulent financial reporting, such a subpoena for documents may encompass all the files underlying the company’s publicly disseminated financial information, including the records underlying the transactions at issue and related emails.

For a CFE’s client company counsel and for the company’s executives generally, the need to respond to the subpoena presents both an opportunity and a dilemma. The opportunity stems from the company’s ability, in responding to the subpoena, to learn about the investigation, an education process that will be critical to a successful criminal defense. The dilemma stems from the need to assess the extent to which active and complete cooperation should be pledged to the prosecutor at the outset. The formulation of a response to a criminal subpoena, therefore, constitutes a critical point in the investigatory process. Those involved are thereby placed in the position of needing to make important decisions at an early stage that can have lasting and significant effects.  The CFE can support them in getting through this process.

Once an initial review of the subpoena and its underlying substance is complete, one of the first steps in formulating a response is often for company counsel to make a phone call to the prosecutor to make appropriate introductions and, to the extent possible, to seek background information regarding the investigation. In this initial contact, the prosecutor will be understandably guarded. Nonetheless, some useful information will frequently be shared. A general impression may be gained about the scope and focus of the investigation and the timing of additional subpoenas and testimony. Thereafter, it is not unusual for an initial meeting to be arranged to discuss in greater detail the company’s response. One benefit of such a meeting is that some level of additional information may be forthcoming.

From the outset, company counsel will be undertaking a process that will be ongoing throughout the criminal proceedings: learning as much as possible about the prosecutor’s case. The reason is that, unlike a civil case, in which broad principles of discovery enable the defendants to learn the details of the adversary’s evidence, the procedural rules of a criminal investigation result in much greater secrecy. Less formal methods of learning the details of the prosecutor’s case, therefore, are critical. In these initial contacts, the establishment of a sound foundation for the company’s dealings with the prosecutor is an important aspect of the investigation. To state it simply, CFE’s should always support that those dealings be premised on a foundation of candor.

Although it may be appropriate at various stages to decline to discuss sensitive matters, counsel should avoid making a factual statement on any subject about which it may be incompletely or inaccurately informed. This admonition applies to subjects such as the existence and location of files, the burden of producing documents, and the availability of witnesses. It also applies to more substantive matters bearing on the guilt or innocence of parties. CFE’s should, again, counsel their clients that a relationship with the prosecutor based on trust and confidence is key.

The judgment regarding the extent of cooperation with the prosecutor can be a tough one. Unlike in a civil proceeding, where cooperation with regulatory authorities (such as the SEC) is generally the preferred approach, the decision to cooperate with the government in a criminal investigation may be much more difficult, insofar as a subsequent effort to oppose the government (should such a change of approach be necessary) would be impeded by the loss of a significant tactical advantage, the loss of surprise. In criminal cases, the government is not afforded the same broad rights of discovery available in civil proceedings. It is entirely possible for a prosecutor to have no significant knowledge of the defense position until after the start of a trial. On the other hand, the privileges available to a corporation are limited. There is, most importantly, no Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination for companies.  Furthermore, almost any kind of evidence, even evidence that would be inadmissible at trial, except for illegal wiretaps or privileged material, can be considered by a grand jury. Therefore, the company’s ability to oppose a grand jury investigation is limited, and the prosecutor may even consider a company’s extensive zeal in opposition to constitute obstruction of justice. Moreover, the prosecutor’s ultimate decision about indictment of the company may be affected by the extent of the company’s cooperation. And corporate management may wish to demonstrate cooperation as a matter of policy or public relations.

One issue with which a company will need to wrestle is whether it is appropriate for a public company or its executives to do anything other than cooperate with the government. On this issue, it is useful for executives to appreciate that the U.S. system of justice affords those being investigated certain fundamental rights, and it is not unpatriotic to take advantage of them. As to individuals, one of the most basic of these rights is the Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination. Insofar as, in fraud cases, guilt can be established through circumstantial evidence, executives need to keep in mind that it demonstrates no lack of civic virtue to take full advantage of constitutional protections designed to protect the innocent.

A challenge is that many of these judgments regarding cooperation must be made at the outset when the company’s information is limited. Often the best approach, at least as a threshold matter, will be one of courteous professionalism, meaning respect for one’s adversary and reasonable accommodation pending more informed judgments down the road. Premature expressions of complete cooperation are best avoided as a subsequent change in approach can give rise to governmental frustration and anger.

Following the initial steps of the grand jury subpoena and the preliminary contact with the prosecutor, CFE’s are uniquely positioned to assist corporate counsel and management in the remaining stages of the criminal investigation of a financial crime:

–Production of documents;
–Grand jury testimony;
–Plea negotiations (if necessary);
–Trial (if necessary).

Cyberfraud & Business Continuity

We received an e-mail inquiry from a follower of our Chapter’s LinkedIn page last week asking specifically about recovery following a cyberfraud penetration and, in general, about disaster planning for smaller financial institutions. It’s a truism that with virtually every type of business process and customer moving away from brick-and-mortar places of business to cloud supported business transactions and communication, every such organization faces an exponential increase in the threat of viruses, bots, phishing attacks, identity theft, and a whole host of other cyberfraud intrusion risks.  All these threats illustrate why a post-intrusion continuity plan should be at or near the top of any organization’s risk assessment, yet many of our smaller clients especially remain stymied by what they feel are the costs and implementational complexity of developing such a plan. Although management understands that it should have a plan, many say, “we’ll have to get to that next year”, yet it never seems to happen.

Downtime due to unexpected penetrations, breeches and disasters of all kinds not only affect our client businesses individually, but can also affect the local, regional, or worldwide economy if the business is sufficiently large or critical. Organizations like Equifax do not operate in a vacuum; they are held accountable by customers, vendors, and owners to operate as expected. Moreover, the extent of the impact on a business depends on the products or services it offers. Having an updated, comprehensive, and tested general continuity plan can help organizations mitigate operational losses in the event of any disaster or major disruption. Whether it’s advising the organization about cyberfraud in general or reviewing the different elements of a continuity plan for fraud impact, the CFE can proactively assist the client organization on the front end in getting a cyberfraud-recovery continuity plan in place and then in ensuring its efficient operation on the back end.

Specifically, regarding the impact of cyberfraud, the ACFE tells us that, until relatively recently, many organizations reported not having directly addressed it in their formal business continuity plans. Some may have had limited plans that addressed only a few financial fraud-related scenarios, such as employee embezzlement or supplier billing fraud, but hadn’t equipped general employees to deal with even the most elemental impacts of cyberfraud.   However, as these threats increasingly loomed, and as their on-line business expanded, more organizations have committed themselves to the process of formally addressing them.

An overall business continuity plan, including targeted elements to address cyberfraud, isn’t a short-term project, but rather an ongoing set of procedures and control definitions that must evolve along with the organization and its environment. It’s an action plan, complete with the tools and resources needed to continue those critical business processes necessary to keep the entity operating after a cyber disruption. Before advising our clients to embark on such a business continuity plan project, we need to make them aware that there is a wealth of documentation available that they can review to help in their planning and execution effort. An example of such documentation is one written for the industry of our Chapter’s inquirer, banking; the U.S. Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council’s (FFIEC’s) Business Continuity Planning Handbook. And there are other such guides available on-line to orient the continuity process for entities in virtually every other major business sector.  While banks are held to a high standard of preparedness, and are subject to regular bank examination, all types of organizations can profit from use of the detailed outline the FFIEC handbook provides as input to develop their own plans. The publication encourages organizations of all sizes to adopt a process-oriented approach to continuity planning that involves business impact analysis as well as fraud risk assessment, management, and monitoring.

An effective plan begins with client commitment from the top. Senior management and the board of directors are responsible for managing and controlling risk; plan effectiveness depends on management’s willingness to commit to the process from start to finish. Working as part of the implementation team, CFEs can make sure both the audit committee and senior management understand this commitment and realize that business disruption from cyber-attack represents an elevated risk to the organization that merits senior-level attention. The goal of this analysis is to identify the impact of cyber threats and related events on all the client organizations’ business processes. Critical needs are assessed for all functions, processes, and personnel, including specialized equipment requirements, outsourced relationships and dependencies, alternate site needs, staff cross-training, and staff support such as specialized training and guidance from human resources regarding related personnel issues. As participants in this process, CFEs acting proactively are uniquely qualified to assist management in the identification of different cyberfraud threats and their potential impacts on the organization.

Risk assessment helps gauge whether planned cyberfraud-related continuity efforts will be successful. Business processes and impact assumptions should be stress tested during this phase. Risks related to protecting customer and financial information, complying with regulatory guidelines, selecting new systems to support the business, managing vendors, and maintaining secure IT should all be considered. By focusing on a single type of potential cyber threat’s impact on the business, our client organizations can develop realistic scenarios of related threats that may disrupt the cyber-targeted processes.  At the risk assessment stage, organization should perform a gap analysis to compare what actions are needed to recover normal operations versus those required for a major business interruption. This analysis highlights cyber exposures that the organization will need to address in developing its recovery plan. Clients should also consider conducting another gap analysis to compare what is present in their proposed or existing continuity plan with what is outlined (in the case of a bank) in the recommendations presented in the FFIEC handbook. This is an excellent way to assess needs and compliance with these and/or the guidelines available for other industries. Here too, CFEs can provide value by employing their skills in fraud risk assessment to assist the organization in its identification of the most relevant cyber risks.

After analyzing the business impact analysis and risk assessment, the organization should devise a strategy to mitigate the risks of business interruption from cyberfraud. This becomes the plan itself, a catalog of steps and checklists, which includes team members and their roles for recovery, to initiate action following a cyber penetration event. The plan should go beyond technical issues to also include processes such as identifying a lead team, creating lists of emergency contacts, developing calling trees, listing manual procedures, considering alternate locations, and outlining procedures for dealing with public relations.  As members of the team CFEs, can work with management throughout response plan creation and installation, consulting on plan creation, while advising management on areas to consider and ensuring that fraud related risks are transparently defined and addressed.

Testing is critical to confirm cyber fraud contingency plans. Testing objectives should start small, with methods such as walkthroughs, and increase to eventually encompass tabletop exercises and full enterprise wide testing. The plan should be reviewed and updated for any changes in personnel, policies, operations, and technology. CFEs can provide management with a fraud-aware review of the plan and how it operates, but their involvement should not replace management’s participation in testing the actual plan. If the staff who may have to execute the plan have never touched it, they are setting themselves up for failure.

Once the plan is created and tested, maintaining it becomes the most challenging activity and is vital to success in today’s ever-evolving universe of cyber threats. Therefore, concurrent updating of the plan in the face of new and emerging threats is critical.

In summary, cyberfraud-threat continuity planning is an ongoing process for all types of internet dependent organizations that must remain flexible as daily threats change and migrate. The plan is a “living” document. The IT departments of organizations are challenged with identifying and including the necessary elements unique to their processes and environment on a continuous basis. Equally important, client management must oversee update of the plan on a concurrent basis as the business grows and introduces new on-line dependent products and services. CFEs can assist by ensuring that their client organizations keep cyberfraud related continuity planning at the top of mind by conducting periodic reviews of the basic plan and by reporting on the effectiveness of its testing.